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Go to: Publications Index Page | Publications Posting Archive Pages: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26

Note: Postings in this archive were originally distributed by the Central-Eurasia-L Announcement List.  They appear here in reverse chronological order, from the most recent posting to the list's beginning (1996).

Central-Eurasia-L Announcement Archive
3. Publications
Page 9

PUBLICATION- Two Books on Central Asia from Palgrave Macmillan

Posted by: Pooja Talwar <Pooja.Talwar(a)macmillan.co.uk>
Posted: 25 Jul 2002


Richard C. Foltz
Religions of the Silk Road: Overland Trade and Cultural Exchange from
Antiquity to the Fifteenth Century
Palgrave Macmillan
Hardcover ISBN: 0333 775279 / Hardcover Price:  £25.00 / 200pp 216x138mm /
October 1999
Paperback ISBN: 0333 94674X / Paperback Price: £14.99 / 208pp 216x138mm /
November 2000

Religions of the Silk Road tells the story of how religions accompanied
merchants and their goods along the overland Asian trade routes of
pre-modern times.  It is a story of continuous movement, encounters, mutual
reactions and responses, adaptation and change.  Beginning as early as the
eighth century BCE, Israelite and Iranian traditions travelled eastwards in
this way, and they were followed centuries later by the great missionary
traditions of Buddhism, Christianity, Manichaeism, and Islam.  The Silk
Route was a formative and transformative rite of passage, and no religion
emerged unchanged at the end of that arduous journey.

Throughout this excellent book Professor Foltz makes clear the importance
of trade and cultural exchanges in the unfolding of history - Journal of
World History

Contents:

 * The Silk Route and its Travellers
 * Religion and Trade in Ancient Eurasia
 * The Rise and Spread of Buddhism
 * Heresies in Flight: Nestorian Christianity and Manichaeism
 * Islam and the Silk Route
 * Ecumenical Mischief Under the Mongols
 * A Melting Pot No More

* * * *

Yongjin Zhang and Rouben Azizian (eds)
Ethnic Challenges Beyond Borders: Chinese and Russian Perspectives of the
Central Asian Conundrum
St. Anthony's Series
Palgrave Macmillan
Hardcover ISBN: 0333 694678 / Hardcover Price: £57.50 / 256pp 222x141mm /
January 1998

A rare collection of essays by leading Chinese and Russian Central Asian
specialists.  The contributors address the problems and challenges posed by
the resurgence of Central Asia to China and Russia.  Both Countries are in
search of a post communist and post cold war order. The editors explore
uncertain transformations in Central Asia and their implications for Chinese
and Russian foreign policies and speculate on the possible outcome of the
current search for a regional order.

Contents:

Introduction; Y. Zhang & R. Azizian

PART 1: POLITICAL CHALLENGES

Russia and Central Asia: Evolution of Mutual Perceptions, Policies, and
Interdependence; A. Kortunov & A. Shoumikhin

China and Central Asia: Towards a New Relationship; G. Xing

Ethnopolitical Issues and the Emergence of Nation-States in Central Asia;
A. Prazauskas

PART 2: THE ETHNIC CONUNDRUM

Ethnic Harmony and Conflicts in Central Asia: Origins and Policies; G. Liu

Russia and Russians in Central Asia; A. Kortunov & S. Lounev

Fundamentalism, Ethnicity and the State: the Cases of Tajikistan, Pakistan,
Iran and Afghanistan; A. Umnov

Population Dynamics in Central Asia and Adjacent Countries from 1960 to
2020; A. Akimov

PART 3: ECONOMIC AGONIES

Central Asia's Transition to a Market Economy: An Analytical Comparison
with China; Z. Sun

Central Asia: Towards Ethnic Harmony Through Openness and Reform?; A.
Salitsky & V. Fisyukov

Sino-Central Asian Trade and Economic Relations: Progress, Problems and
Prospect; Q. Liu

PART 4: STRATEGIC AND SECURITY ISSUES

Security Issues in China's Relations with Central Asian States; G. Xing

Central Asia and the World: Foreign Policy and Strategic Issues; S. Lounev &
G. Shirokov

For all orders please contact:

Macmillan Direct Customer Services
Brunel Road, Houndmills
Basingstoke, RG21 6XS
Registered in England Number 968619
Telephone: (+44) 1256 302794
Fax: (+44) 1256 330688
E-Mail: mdl(a)macmillan.co.uk / orders(a)palgrave.com
Web: www.palgrave.com

PUBLICATION- Volunteer Voices, Issue 7 - Volunteerism in Central Asia

Posted by: Annabel Soizic Dubot <Annabel.Soizic.Dubot(a)unvolunteers.org>
Posted: 23 Jul 2002


Dear Friends,

I am happy to announce that the seventh issue of Volunteer Voices (the
UN e-newsletter on volunteerism in Central-Asia and the CIS region) is now
on-line at this following link:

<www.iyv2001.org/iyv_eng/news/index.htm>

The titles you will find in this issue are:

 * Ukraine: volunteers involved with the Global Youth Service Day
 * Georgia: volunteers celebrating Children's Defense Day
 * Kyrgyzstan: volunteers made possible the 1rst Special Olympics Games
 * Russia: towards a civil alternative to military service: beneficial for
   the voluntary sector?
 * Organisation of the month: Kazakhstan's Pavlodar social volunteers'
   centre
 * Volunteers'story: Galina Ilyina in Kazakhstan

Also, we encourage you to tell us of any volunteer-related issues taking 
place in the CIS region and Mongolia (seminar, event, project, publication, 
work camp, survey, policy...). You can send your contributions directly to 
the editor, by e-mail (preferably including a picture).

If you want to subscribe to our mailing list, send me a message with your 
e-mail address, your name and your link to volunteerism.

We hope that you will enjoy the reading and find it interesting.

Sincerely,

Annabel Soizic DUBOT
VV Editor
UNV Brussels
Annabel.Soizic.Dubot(a)unvolunteers.org

PUBLICATION- "A Gathering Storm?" and 3 Other Books edited by Boris Rumer

Posted by: Louise Decker <ldecker(a)mesharpe.com>
Posted: 20 Jul 2002


A Gathering Storm?

Edited by Boris Rumer, Harvard University, Davis Center for Russian and 
Eurasian Studies

This survey of political, economic, and social developments in Central Asia
offers geopolitical context, unparalleled coverage, and analytical depth to
our understanding of a region that can no longer be safely ignored.

Table of Contents:

Part I: Overview

1. Problems of Growth and Stability in Central Asia, Boris Rumer

Part II: Security

2. The Conflict in Afghanistan: Conditions, Problems, and Prospects, Sultan 
   Akimbekov

3. Regional Security in Central Asia: Military Aspects, Rustam Burnashev

Part III: Foreign Policy Framework

4. Central Asia Between Two Gravitational Poles: Russia and China,
   Konstantin Syroezhkin

5. Central Asia and Europe, Murat Laumulin

Part IV: Islam and Politics

6. The Central Asian Nexus: Islam and Politics, Evgenii Abdullaev

7. Islam and Uzbekistan: From the Struggle for "Religious Purity" to
   Political Activism, Bakhtiar Babadzhanov

Part V: Economics

8. Central Asia: Development Under Conditions of Globalization, Stanislav
   Zhukov

9. Challenges to Economic Policy in Central Asia: Is a Miracle Possible?
   Eshref Trushin and Eskender Trushin

About the Editor and Contributors, Index

September 2002. 432 pp. Tables, index. 
0-7656-0862-6 Hardcover $75.95
0-7656-0866-9 Paperback $29.95

* * * *

Central Asia and the New Global Economy

Edited by Boris Rumer, Harvard University, Davis Center for Russian and 
Eurasian Studies

Central Asia's new states have been buffeted by financial ill winds from
East Asia and Russia and by Islamic revolutionary movements from the south. 
This volume analyzes the geopolitical and macroeconomic situation of
Central Asia and alternative scenarios for the foreseeable future.

Table of Contents:

1. Economic Crisis and Growing Intraregional Tensions, Boris Rumer

2. The Economic Development of Central Asia in the 1990s, Stanislav Zhukov

3. Basic Problems of Market Transition in Central Asia, Eskender Trushin and
   Eshref Trushin

4. Adapting to Globalization, Stanislav Zhukov

5. Foreign Trade and Investment, Stanislav Zhukov

6. Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan: The Economic Consequences of Membership in the
   World Trade Organization, Eskender Trushin and Eshref Trushin

7. Central Asia and the Asian-Pacific Region, Oksana Reznikova

8. Central Asia: Mid-Term Economic Prospects, Stanislav Zhukov

2000. 306 pp. Map, tables, bibliography, index. 
0-7656-0629-1 Hardcover $66.95

* * * *

Central Asia: The Challenges of Independence

Edited by: Boris Rumer, Harvard University, Davis Center for Russian and 
Eurasian Studies, and Stanislav Zhukov, Institute of World Economy and 
International Relations (IMEMO), Russian Academy of Sciences

A rare look at the geopolitics and geo-economics of the newest of emerging
market regions, including analyses from in-country and international
experts.

Table of Contents:

1. Introduction, Boris Rumer and Stanislav Zhukov

I. Central Asia on the Eve of the Twenty-First Century

2. The Geo-economic Significance of Central Asia, Boris Rumer and Stanislav
   Zhukov

3. Post-Soviet Modernization in Central Asia: Realities and Prospects,
   Umirserik Kasenov

II. Economic Performance, Boris Rumer and Stanislav Zhukov

4. Broader Parameters: Development in the Twentieth Century

5. Structural Changes

6. Economic Integration in Central Asia: Problems and Prospects

7. Between Two Gravitational Pulls: Russia and China

III. External Dynamics: Foreign Trade

8. Kazakhstan: Foreign Trade Policy, Markhamat  Khasanova

9. Uzbekistan: Foreign Economic Activity, Eshref Trushin

IV. Critical Economic Issues

10. Kazakhstan: The Prospects and Perils of Foreign Investment, Arystan
   Esentugelov

11. Uzbekistan: Problems of Development and Reform in Agriculture, Eskender
   Trushin

1998. 324 pp. Tables, bibliography, index. 
0-7656-0254-7 Hardcover $77.95

* * * *

Central Asia in Transition: Dilemmas of Political and Economic Development
Edited by: Boris Rumer, Harvard University, Davis Center for Russian and 
Eurasian Studies

An international team of experts offers systematic, documented analysis of
the strategic choices facing the Central Asian states.

Table of Contents:

1. Disintegration and Reintegration in Central Asia, Boris Rumer

2. Transnational Corporations in Central Asia, Oksana Reznikova

3. Economic Development in the States of Central Asia, Stanislas Zhukov

4. Uzbekistan: A National Path to the Market, Rustam Dosumov

5. Kyrgyzstan: Economic Crisis and Transition Strategy, Turar Koichuev

6. Kazakhstan: Problems and Prospects of Reform and Development, Arystan
   Esentugelov

7. An Alternative Perspective on the Economic Development of Kazakhstan,
   Boris Rumer and Erik Asanbaev

8. The Experience of Transitional Economies in East Asia: Implications for
   Central Asia, Yasutami Shimomura

9. Afterword, Boris Rumer

Selected Bibliography; Index

1996. 308 pp. Tables, bibliography, index. 
1-56324-766-6 Hardcover $86.95


TO ORDER, OR FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:

Louise Decker, Marketing Manager
M.E. Sharpe, Inc. 
80 Business Park Drive, Armonk, NY 10504

Tel: (914) 273-1800, x145 / Fax: (914) 273-2106
ldecker(a)mesharpe.com
or visit our website at: www.mesharpe.com

PUBLICATION- Istanbul Intrigues, Barry Rubin

Posted by: GLORIA Center <truejoy(a)NETVISION.NET.IL>
Posted: 17 Jul 2002


New book available from Bosphorus Press:

ISTANBUL INTRIGUES
By Barry Rubin
Bosphorus University Press
<http://gloria.idc.ac.il/publications/books/istanbul_intrigues.html>

This is the new English edition of the book on war, diplomacy, and espionage 
on Istanbul and the Balkans during World War Two. Based on extensive use of 
archives and dozens of interviews with participants, Istanbul Intrigues 
combines new information on that period as well as telling the story of 
individuals caught up in that complex and exciting era. The book covers the 
Allied and Axis struggle over winning Turkey's support; covert efforts to 
liberate Greece, Romania, Bulgaria and Hungary, the role of journalists, the 
rise and fall of spy networks, the attempts to rescue Jews, and other events.

In addition, the book analyzes Turkish policy and the positions of the key 
Turkish leaders, using British, American, and German archives.  It recounts 
the earnest but often bumbling way that the United States started its own 
intelligence agency as well as how the region slipped into the Cold War.

The remarkable cast of characters in this true story includes, Stalin's 
chief murder expert, stalking Berlin's ambassador to try to set off a 
German-Turkish war; the young Vatican emissary who later became Pope John 
XXIII; Hungarian leaders secretly negotiating peace with the Allies; an 
eccentric American ex-governor who considered himself the world's greatest 
superspy; and the British ambassador's valet who became the greatest German 
agent of the war (though his information was ignored).

335 pages, $15 plus postage.
To order, write to us at: <gloria(a)idc.ac.il> or contact the publisher at:
<bupress(a)buvak.org.tr> or
Bogazici Universitesi Yayinevi
Bogazici Universitesi Kuzey Kampus ETA B Blok Zemin Kat Etiler-Istanbul
tel. & fax: +902122578727

PUBLICATION- Turkey in World Politics, Barry Rubin and Kemal Kirisci, eds.

Posted by: GLORIA Center <truejoy(a)NETVISION.NET.IL>
Posted: 17 Jul 2002


New book available from Bosphorus Press:

The Turkish language translation of TURKEY IN WORLD POLITICS:

GUNUMUZDE TURKIYE'NIN DIS POLITIKASI
Edited by Barry Rubin, Kemal Kirisci:

Once characterized by an avoidance of foreign entanglements, Turkey's 
diplomacy has changed dramatically in the present era of regional agreements 
and organizations. Tracing the evolution of that change, this comprehensive 
study explores the country's new international posture.

The authors assess Turkey's policy toward Europe, Russia, Central Asia, and 
the U.S., as well as its growing role within the Middle East region. They 
also address in depth the critical issues of economic, energy, and water 
policy. Their discussion of the interest groups and institutions affecting 
the policymaking process and the challenges facing the country's rapidly 
urbanizing and industrializing economy contribute to the picture of a 
complex, dynamic nation.

Paperback, 13.5 x 21 cm, viii+396 pp., index, ISBN 975-518-170-9, $15
To order:
Bogazici Universitesi Yayinevi
Bogazici Universitesi Kuzey Kampus ETA B Blok Zemin Kat Etiler-Istanbul
tel. & fax: +90 (212) 257-8727
e-mail: <bupress(a)buvak.org.tr>

To read the description in Turkish:
<http://gloria.idc.ac.il/publications/books/turkey_world_politics_turkish.html>
To order this book in English, see:
<http://gloria.idc.ac.il/publications/books/turkey_world_politics.html>

PUBLICATION- Rethinking Central Asia: Non-Eurocentric Studies..., Korkut Ertürk, ed.

Posted by: Emma G Hawker <emmahawker(a)garnet-ithaca.demon.co.uk>
Posted: 27 Jun 2002


Rethinking Central Asia
Non-Eurocentric Studies in History, Social Structure and Identity

Edited by Korkut A. Ertürk

This book re-examines the place of Central Asia in world history and argues 
that Central Asia has to be thought of in its own terms, rather than within 
an Eurocentric framework. By reflecting on its unique history in state and 
identity formation, social structure and gender relations, the contributions 
to this volume show that studying Central Asia Is important not only for its 
own sake but also because of the contributions it can make to comparative 
social theory.

Dr Korkut A. Ertürk is Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of 
Utah. He obtained his Ph.D. in economics from the New School for Social 
Research, New York. 

29 October 1998 - 304pp - 235 x 155 mm - Cased £35.00 - ISBN 0 86372 240 7 - 
WW 

In both its Weberian and Marxist roots, Western sociology tends to posit as 
universal law a close link between the emergence of the state and social 
differentiation based on property ownership. The contributions in this 
volume outline a different principle based on political differentiation (as 
opposed to economic) that seems to have been at play in state formation 
among the Central Asian tribes. Sharon Bastug's analysis of tribal social 
structure and confederation in its relation to state formation and Isenbike 
Togan's discussion of patterns of legitimization complement Andre Gunder 
Frank's broader criticism of the Western interpretation of world history. 
Similarly, Isenbike Togan's paper on patriarchy and gender relations in 
Central Asia shows that generalizations based on European history are not 
necessarily applicable elsewhere, while papers by Serif Mardin and Aydin 
Çeçen examine the historical dynamics of the articulation of self-identity 
in Central Asia. Two important implications follow from this work: firstly, 
that Eurocentric interpretations of Central Asia are at best misleading and 
at worst detrimental to our understanding of the region; secondly, that 
studying Central Asia is important not only for its own sake but also 
because of the contributions it can make to comparative social theory by 
reflecting on its unique history in state and identity formation, social 
structure and gender relations.

CONTENTS

Introduction, Korkut A. Erturk

ReOrient: From the Centrality of Central Asia to China's Middle Kingdom, 
Andre Gunder Frank

Patterns of Legitimization of Rule in the History of the Turks, Isenbike Togan

Central Asian Societies and the Oral Literature of Epic Heroes, Lois A. Giffen

Tribe, Confederation and State among Altaic Nomads of the Asian Steppes, 
Sharon Bastug

Abdurreshid Ibrahim and Zeki Velidi Togan in the History of the Muslims of 
Russia, Serif Mardin

Uzbekistan between Central Asia and the Middle East: Another Perspective, A. 
Aydin Cecen

In Search of an Approach to the History of Women In Central Asia, Isenbike 
Togan


Emma G Hawker
Editorial Manager

Garnet Publishing
(incorporating Ithaca Press and South Street Press)
8 Southern Court
South Street
READING
RG1 4QS

Tel: (0)118 959 7847
Fax: (0) 118 959 7356
Web: www.garnet-ithaca.co.uk

PUBLICATION- CD of Pre-Soviet Recordings from the Caucasus and Central Asia

Posted by: Will Prentice <will.prentice(a)bl.uk>
Posted: 25 Jun 2002


BEFORE THE REVOLUTION: A 1909 RECORDING EXPEDITION IN THE CAUCASUS AND
CENTRAL ASIA BY THE GRAMOPHONE COMPANY (various artists)
Topic Records TSCD921
Compact disc, 23 tracks, 16 pp. booklet with extensive liner notes and 
photographs
Compilation and text by Will Prentice

In 1909, the Gramophone Company of London sent one of their recording 
engineers on an epic 5,000 mile journey across the southern regions of the 
Russian Empire. From the Caucasus mountains to the deserts of Central Asia, 
Franz Hampe recorded the various cultures and ethnic groups he encountered.

What resulted was an incredibly intimate view of pre-Soviet life, in the 
form of almost 1,200 music recordings. Now, for the first time in over 90 
years, a representative sample from the expedition can be heard. The 23 
tracks range from Caucasian male choirs to classical maqam singers from 
Bukhara and the Ferghana Valley, and include several musicians who have 
attained legendary status in the intervening decades, such as Jabbar 
Karyagdy from Baku/Shushi and Mulla Tuichi Tashmuhammedov from Tashkent.

>From GEORGIA, ARMENIA, AZERBAIJAN, CHECHNYA and other culture groups in the 
northern Caucasus, as well as AFGHANISTAN, KAZAKHSTAN, TAJIKISTAN, 
UZBEKISTAN and XINJIANG in Central Asia, they were recorded at a point when 
few of these names appeared on any map. Digitally remastered and with 
extensive liner notes, this CD offers a rare link to a little known time, 
before the Soviet era changed the lives and music practices of the region 
for ever. The booklet includes rare photographs of several of the artists, 
including one never before published, plus colour illustrations taken from 
the original advertising catalogues.

Remastered from rare 78 rpm discs to give outstanding sound - from nearly a 
century ago.

Available from:
Topic Records
50 Stroud Green Road
Finsbury Park
London N4 3ES
UK
email: mailorder(a)topicrecords.co.uk
http://www.topicrecords.co.uk/topic_records_whats_new.html

PUBLICATION- Historical Dictionaries of Asia Series, Scarecrow Press

Posted by: Melissa Kay <mkay(a)scarecrowpress.com>
Posted: 24 Jun 2002


Contact:  Melissa Kay
301.459.3366 Ext. 5616
Fax: 301.429.5748


The Historical Dictionary of Azerbaijan
Brian C. Collins and Tadeusz Swietochowski
1999, ISBN 0-8108-3550-, 160 pages, $40.00, Cloth
http://www.scarecrowpress.com/Catalog/SingleBook.shtml?command=Search&db=^DB
/CATALOG.db&eqSKUdata=0810835509

The history of Azerbaijan is a chronology of its domination. Its most recent 
ruler was the USSR, but Azerbaijan has been within the boundaries of many 
conquerors from the Medians to Alexander the Great to the Arabs and Turks. 
Through the long history of foreign occupations, the Azeris have preserved a 
national identity and they have periodically generated local leaders. With 
the recent break up of the USSR, Azerbaijan can once again assert itself as 
an independent nation. Strategically located and of economic interest to 
other nations, Azerbaijan cannot be ignored. 

The Azeris are united by their language, Azeris, their religion, Islam, and 
a common history. However, since the Russian conquest of northern Azerbaijan 
in the first half of the nineteenth century, they have been divided by 
politics. Azerbaijan is a divided land; its cultural boundaries stretch 
beyond the geopolitical ones so that a large portion of what was once 
Azerbaijan is currently part of Iran, and more Azerbaijanis live within Iran 
(in Iranian Azerbaijan) than in the independent Republic of Azerbaijan.

The contemporary history of Azerbaijan has been a complicated story. There 
is an on-going conflict with neighboring Armenia, which has shaped not only 
foreign policy and relations, but also the domestic politics of the nation. 
Those politics have been further complicated by Western interest in 
Azerbaijani offshore oil deposits.
Given its history, Azerbaijan is certainly not the easiest country to 
describe. This historical dictionary does an excellent job despite the 
difficulties. It provides entries on persons, institutions and events, with 
some emphasis on recent periods, but with a view of the earliest history. 
There are other entries on the important aspects of the economy, society, 
religion and culture. Also useful are an introduction for context, and a 
helpful chronology. A select bibliography of works in English and other 
languages completes the volume.

Tadeusz Swietochowski is a noted scholar of Azerbaijan and a professor at 
Monmouth University. Brian C. Collins is a graduate of Monmouth University. 
He is currently the Executive Director of the Cedar Falls Historical 
Society. Arcadia Press is publishing his book Cedar Falls in its Images of 
America Series.


NEW!
Historical Dictionary of Armenia
Rouben Paul Adalian
September 2002, ISBN 0-8108-4337-4 552 pages, $85.00, Cloth
http://www.scarecrowpress.com/Catalog/SingleBook.shtml?command=Search&db=^DB
/CATALOG.db&eqSKUdata=0810843374


FORTHCOMING!
Historical Dictionary of Mongolia
Second Edition
Alan J. K. Sanders
December 2002, ISBN 0-8108-4434-6, 512 pages, $97.00, Cloth
http://www.scarecrowpress.com/Catalog/SingleBook.shtml?command=Search&db=^DB
/CATALOG.db&eqSKUdata=0810830779


NEW!
Historical Dictionary of Tajikistan 
Kamoludin Abdullaev and Shahram Akbarzadeh
February 2002, ISBN 0-8108-4184-3, 320 pages, $69.50, Cloth
http://www.scarecrowpress.com/Catalog/SingleBook.shtml?command=Search&db=^DB
/CATALOG.db&eqSKUdata=0810841843


Historical Dictionary of Afghanistan
Ludwig W. Adamec
1997, ISBN 0-8108-3312-3, 512 pages, $65.00, Cloth
http://www.scarecrowpress.com/Catalog/SingleBook.shtml?command=Search&db=^DB
/CATALOG.db&eqSKUdata=0810833123
 

Scarecrow Press, Inc.
4720 Boston Way
Lanham, MD 20706
Order online and save %15
www.scarecrowpress.com

PUBLICATION- Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst, 19 June 2002 Issue on Web

Posted by: Svante Cornell <svante.cornell(a)pcr.uu.se>
Posted: 23 Jun 2002


The 19 June 2002 Issue of the Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst, a subscription 
free Web journal with over 114,000 visitors to the site since January 2000 is 
now on-line at http://www.cacianalyst.org/

The Central Asia-Caucasus Institute of The Johns Hopkins University-The Nitze 
School of Advanced International Studies is proud to announce the publication 
of the 19 June 2002 issue of its biweekly Web-Journal, The Central Asia-
Caucasus Analyst. 

The Institute also offers its readers the option of downloading The Analyst in 
PDF format, enabling readers to view and print out the entire issue of The 
Analyst. The html version will, of course, remain available.

THE ANALYTICAL ARTICLES INCLUDE:

AFGHANISTAN TAKES A CAUTIOUS LEAP FORWARD: TRAVAILS OF THE LOYA JIRGA
Rahimullah Yusufzai
The historic Loya Jirga this week showed clearly that Afghanistan is ready to 
embrace democracy after 24 years of conflict. Delegates' urge to be heard was 
so great that it often led to heated discussions and even scuffles. However, 
the Loya Jirga suffered from a host of shortcomings. It started late and was 
extended beyond its schedule; the delay in publishing the Loya Jirga's rules 
of procedure, uncertainty about its agenda, and the absence of official list 
of its members contributed to the confusion. Backroom political deals caused 
much anguish among the delegates and repeatedly triggered uproar. However, the 
Loya Jirga members took their job much more seriously than anticipated by the 
Afghan warlords who over the past two decades have controlled Afghanistan's 
destiny.

WILL IRANIAN-AZERBAIJANI TIES IMPROVE AFTER PRESIDENT ALIYEV'S VISIT TO IRAN? 
Hooman Peimani
After three years of delay, President Heydar Aliyev paid an official three-day 
visit to Iran in May that demonstrated an interest in Azerbaijan for improving 
ties with Iran. President Aliyev's objectives for better ties include both 
state-to-state issues such as the division of the Caspian Sea and Azerbaijan's 
need for Iran's help in resolving the Nagorno Karabakh conflict. They also 
include personal issues such as his attempts to ensure the presidency of his 
son after he is gone from the political scene. However, while both Iran and 
Azerbaijan have interests in improving relations, various internal and 
external factors will "guarantee" their uneasy ties for the foreseeable future.

THE OSCE MINSK GROUP: IS THERE SPACE FOR IMPROVEMENT?
Fariz Ismailzade
On May 8, 2002, Deputy Foreign Ministers of Armenia and Azerbaijan, Tatul 
Margaryan and Araz Azimov, recently appointed to be the special 
representatives of Azerbaijani and Armenian Presidents on Nagorno- Karabakh 
conflict, met in Prague in an attempt to revitalize the peace dialogue between 
the two countries and find a solution to the 14-year old conflict. The meeting 
produced no tangible results, and whether subsequent meetings between the 
special envoys will produce any results depends not only the willingness of 
the warring countries to make painful compromises, but also on the work of the 
Minsk group itself. Significant changes from the current style of mediation 
are needed in order to bring positive impact to the peace process.

THE TRANS-AFGHAN PIPELINE, A PIPE DREAM FORGING REALITY
Ron Callari and Tariq Saeedi 
A decade in the planning, feasibility studies, inadequate financing, wars and 
alternate routes all testify to the implausibility of a successful pipeline 
being laid down from the gas-rich fields of Turkmenistan, via Afghanistan on 
route to points southeast in Pakistan and potentially extending on to New 
Delhi. Yet the Trans-Afghan pipeline continues to thrive as a viable project 
in potentially delivering liquefied natural gas over a 1500-km landlocked path 
of treacherous terrain. The dreams for a modern day Silk Road are slowly 
reaching conclusion in the 21st Century.

THE FIELD REPORTS INCLUDE:

TENSIONS AND CLASHES IN NARDARAN 
On June 4, armed clashes in the notoriously rebellious village of Nardaran 
just outside Baku left one dead and dozens injured. The authorities strong-
handed approach has brought both domestic and international criticism, while 
the government seems unprepared to handle the situation.

KAZAKHSTAN KNOCKS THE DOOR OF THE WTO 
There have been several rounds of talks between the Kazakh government and WTO 
representatives in the past six years. Despite optimistic official 
declarations, both sides admit that there are still many hurdles to be 
surmounted before Kazakhstan's dream of becoming an equal member of the world 
trade community comes true.

REVIEW OF GEORGIA'S PRELIMINARY LOCAL ELECTIONS RETURNS
Georgia has held municipal elections that were relatively chaotic and produced 
no clear winner. The elections do not seem to have been intentionally rigged, 
though local-level problems were occasionally large. The elections also showed 
a sharp difference between Tbilisi and the regions.

UZBEKISTAN WITHDRAWAL FROM GUUAM CAUSED SHOCK REACTION IN BAKU
Uzbekistan's June 13 decision to withdraw from the GUUAM alliance seems to 
have been a complete surprise for the Azerbaijani leadership. There is no 
obvious explanation for the Uzbek decision, which has spurred debate both on 
Uzbekistan's foreign policy orientation and on the future of GUUAM cooperation.

The Analyst provides a rigorous, concise and nonpartisan forum where 
specialists can assess issues and events in the Central Asia-Caucasus region 
for a broad audience of business people, journalists, policy makers, 
government officials, diplomats and academics.  The Analyst seeks regional 
specialists, journalists, economists, and political scientists to join its 
pool of authors who are then asked to contribute short, timely, analytical 
articles, ca. 900-1000 words in length. The institute pays a honorarium to the 
authors. The Analyst also seeks local experts, corporate representatives and 
NGO representatives from the region to write Field Reports for a modest 
honorarium. 

The Analyst provides factual, objective and analytical articles valuing fresh 
insights rather than the conventional wisdom.  We welcome readers and writers 
from various perspectives and viewpoints.  We value your comments and 
suggestions.

Those interested in joining The Analyst's pool of authors to contribute 
articles, field reports or contacts of potential writers, please send your CV 
to: svante.cornell(a)pcr.uu.se and suggest some topics on which you would like 
to write. Please remember that The Analyst does not accept double submissions.


Svante E. Cornell, Acting Editor
Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst
Central Asia-Caucasus Institute
The Johns Hopkins University
Nitze School of Advanced International Studies
1619 Massachusetts Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20036
Tel. 1-202-663-7712
Fax. 1-202-663-7785
svante.cornell(a)pcr.uu.se

PUBLICATION- Inner Asia, Vol. 4, No. 1

Posted by: A. Johnson <aj(a)erica.demon.co.uk>
Posted: 23 Jun 2002


Inner Asia
Volume 4  2002  Issue 1


SPECIAL ISSUE: TRAVELLING CULTURES AND HISTORIES:
NATION-BUILDING AND FRONTIER POLITICS IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY CHINA

CONTENTS

Editorial Introduction, Uradyn E. Bulag

TRAVEL-WRITING IMAGINED COMMUNITIES

The Power of Imagination: Whose Northeast and Whose Manchuria?
Li Narangoa

Between Chinese Nationalism and Soviet Colonisation: A Chinese Orientalist's 
Narration of Inner and Outer Mongolia (1926-1927)
Wurlig Borchigud

TRAVEL AS CULTURE ON THE BORDERLAND

Allegorising the Local on the Borderland: Ai Wu's Nanxingji and National 
Subjectivity
Peng Wenbin

The Barbarian Borderland and the Chinese Imagination:
Travellers in Wa Country
Magnus Fiskesjoe

Triste and Carol on the Journey to the Cool Mountains: Culture as Travel
Pan Jiao

ETHNOHISTORY AND MINZU CONFIGURATION

How Many Minzu in a Nation? Modern Travellers Meet China's Frontier Peoples
Jonathan N. Lipman

Searching for Qiang Culture in the First Half of the Twentieth Century
Ming-ke Wang

An Ethnographic World Formulated:
On Yih-fu Ruey's Academic Construction of Minority Histories and Cultures in 
South China
Shih-chung Hsieh

BOOK REVIEW

Urgunge Onon (trans.) The Secret History of the Mongols:
The Life and Times of Chinggis Khan (A. Huerelbaatar)


ABSTRACTS of articles listed above

TRAVEL-WRITING IMAGINED COMMUNITIES

The Power of Imagination: Whose Northeast and Whose Manchuria?
Li Narangoa

In the early twentieth century, Manchuria became what Owen Lattimore called 
a 'Cradle of Conflict' where Russia and Japan competed for supremacy in 
Northeast Asia. Russian and Japanese involvement in Mongolia and Manchuria, 
especially after the Russo-Japanese War, compelled Chinese authorities to 
certify that the Northeast (Dongbei), that is Manchuria, was an integral 
part of China. Japan, for its part, asserted the opposite and represented 
Manchuria as a territory separate from China in order to justify its 
presence there. In this paper I argue that Japanese and Chinese travellers' 
accounts, their reconnaissance or memoir writings on Manchuria and its 
Manchu and Mongolian inhabitants, were part of larger geographical and 
historical constructions of power struggle, in terms of both the Japanese 
claim for Manchuria and the Chinese 'response' to the loss of Manchuria.


Between Chinese Nationalism and Soviet Colonisation: A Chinese Orientalist's 
Narration of Inner and Outer Mongolia (1926-1927)
Wurlig Borchigud

This essay questions the nature of 'Chinese orientalism' vis-a-vis the 
Western model of 'orientalism'. It examines the dialectics of the 
interconnection between Chinese civilisation/nationalism and Soviet 
communist colonisation/modernisation, and how these shape and limit the 
perceptions of a Chinese scholar politician, Ma Hetian, in his travel 
writing about Inner and Outer Mongolia in the mid 1920s. Unlike most travel 
writings which focus on cultural differences of the 'inferior' others as 
study object and aesthetic idol, Ma's was a political travel writing, which 
represents his Chinese Nationalist Party and the Chinese Republican 
government in relation to its internal frontier Inner Mongolia and the 
independent 'Outer Mongolia' (the MPR) at the time. This political travel 
writing challenges Kojin Karatani's coherent though essentialised 
reinterpretation of orientalism from its specific sociocultural contexts and 
geopolitical positions. Similarly to Western orientalists, Ma had an 
authority to speak of his 'inferior' Inner Mongol objects as their civiliser 
as well as to represent his 'helpless' Outer Mongol 'brothers' as their 
national guardian. However, unlike many orientalists (Western and 
non-Western), Ma's politically charged Sino-centric position and often 
chauvinistic attitude towards Mongols align him closer to his 'enemy/friend' 
- Soviet Russia.


TRAVEL AS CULTURE ON THE BORDERLAND

Allegorising the Local on the Borderland: Ai Wu's Nanxingji and National 
Subjectivity
Peng Wenbin

This paper offers a reading of Ai Wu's Nanxingji series (Trilogy of Travel 
Through the South) depicting the author 's journey from Yunnan to Burma in 
the May Fourth era and his subsequent returns to the border regions of 
Yunnan in the socialist period. It explores the ways in which allegorical 
dimensions of 'the local' shift at different social-historical junctures: 
'the local' as a site in need of reforms in the 1920s, in socialist reality 
in the early 1960s, and in traumatic memories of the Cultural Revolution in 
the early 1980s. In extrapolating these 'local' dimensions embedded in the 
Nanxingji series, this paper suggests a contingent rather than a causal 
relationship between national incorporation and 'the local' formations. 
Additionally, this paper highlights how travel operates as an allegorical 
device, linking 'the personal' to the interplay of local specificities and 
the national imaginary, and how travel styles themselves change over time.


The Barbarian Borderland and the Chinese Imagination:
Travellers in Wa Country
Magnus Fiskesjoe

The Wa lands continue to be seized upon in the Chinese imagination, and 
elsewhere too, as representing what is dangerous and off limits. This is one 
important underlying reason why these lands, located in between China and 
Burma, have been some of the least-travelled areas on China's southwestern 
borders during most of the last few centuries. In fact, these areas have 
long been regarded as impenetrable for outsider travellers unless assisted 
by a full-fledged army, its gunpowder dry and its guns loaded. In the last 
years of the nineteenth century, the British occupation of Burma as well as 
increasing opium trade prompted increases in the numbers of Chinese and 
other visitors: officials, soldiers, traders, and so on. The first attempt 
at delineating a Burma-China border having failed, a second, joint 
British-Chinese survey was launched and almost completed in the late 1930s. 
These activities prompted a flurry of patriotic-scholarly efforts to claim 
these borderlands for the reconstituted Chinese state, which continued into 
the second half of the twentieth century. This brief paper explores some of 
the conflicting views of the various kinds of travellers and locals, 
including early Chinese judgments of the Wa, the nationalistic and 
scientistic travellers and writers of the 1930s, as well as the teams of 
ethnologists and soldiers dispatched there in the 1950s and 1960s - notably 
also Alan Winnington, the famous British correspondent for the Morning Star, 
and his Wa reception.


Triste and Carol on the Journey to the Cool Mountains: Culture as Travel
Pan Jiao

This paper discusses Lin Yaohua's ethnography of the Yi people, made in the 
early 1940s. It points out that, in contrast to what the recent reflexive 
anthropologists criticise, Lin's writing talked more about his travelling to 
the Yi society than his dwelling therein and it highlighted the spectrum of 
the difference between Yi and Chinese peoples rather than metonymically 
froze the Yi as the inalienable Other. Drawing on the case, I argue that the 
anti-essentialist reflection on the traditional anthropology should not 
essentialise the latter: 1) Traditional anthropologists' strategy to 
localise their object of study doesn't inevitably lead to privileging the 
relation of dwelling over that of travel. Due to the difficulty and danger 
in entering the Yi area at that time, Lin localised the Yi by showing how 
hard to get there instead of how long to be there. 2) Writing 'against 
culture' has different implications in different circumstances. While it is 
intended to defrost the inferior Other frozen as culture in some places, it 
was in complicity with the Chinese state's power penetration in the Yi case. 


ETHNOHISTORY AND MINZU CONFIGURATION

How Many Minzu in a Nation? Modern Travellers Meet China's Frontier Peoples
Jonathan N. Lipman

Through the writings of three modern travellers, this essay examines the 
role of domestic non-Chinese, on the northwestern frontiers of Chinese 
culture, in the imagining of a new nation-state. Ma Hetian, Fan Changjiang, 
and Gu Jiegang went to the same places in the mid-1930s and observed very 
similar phenomena, but because they travelled to the northwest for very 
different purposes and with very different theories in mind, their 
conclusions differed radically. Ma Hetian saw a Guomindang vision, a single 
and united Chinese people (in potential), divided only by religion and 
language. Fan Changjiang, a leftist journalist, saw various peoples 
competing and conflicting for scarce resources in an exploited, impoverished 
frontier region. Gu Jiegang, an antiquarian scholar, concluded that the 
northwest could be a reservoir of virile, martial strength of a new China. 
All three of them relied on the notion of minzu, which was then a much more 
flexible and less centrally determined concept than it is today, to 
understand what they saw.


Searching for Qiang Culture in the First Half of the Twentieth Century
Ming-ke Wang

This paper critically examines attempts by western missionaries, scholars 
and Chinese intellectuals during the first half of the twentieth century at 
defining the 'Qiang culture', for the purpose of delineating the ethnic 
boundaries of the 'Qiang nationality', in western China. I start by 
introducing a long historical process, in respect of boundary-formation, 
from the Shang to the later Qing period, which finally turned the habitants 
of the Upper Min River valley into a cultural and ethnic mix of hybrids 
between the Han and the Tibetan. Then, I explore how these outside observers 
- western missionaries/scholars and Chinese intellectuals - had attempted to 
find the exemplar of the Qiang culture that could fit in with the 'history' 
of the 'Qiang people' each of these authors bore in mind. Even though these 
attempts produced many confusing aspects, possible misunderstandings and 
debatable results, nonetheless the works produced and the ethnographical 
data contained have become important sources for the Han Chinese to later 
construct the ethnic category of the Qiang in the scheme of the Chinese 
nation, and also for the Qiang natives to build their own culture and 
history. I argue that the modern Qiang nationality was not necessarily the 
product of the ethno/cultural-centralism of the Han Chinese, but was 
produced after a battle between many centrisms, and that the modern attempt 
by the Han to define 'the Qiang' through their history and culture is not 
necessarily a new 'invention' but only the newest attempt at defining the 
western ethnic boundary of the Han Chinese, which had been defined, 
persisted and then was re-defined periodically for more than two thousand 
years.


An Ethnographic World Formulated:
On Yih-fu Ruey's Academic Construction of Minority Histories and Cultures in 
South China
Shih-chung Hsieh

Yih-fu Ruey was one of the most important ethnologists in the history of 
anthropological development in China and Taiwan. Ruey's kind of ethnology 
can be divided into ethnic classification of China, ethnography of minority 
peoples, and ethnohistory of the non-Han group in the Southwest. Ruey had 
very limited 'standard' field records in contacting people's daily lives, 
but did have full experiences of travelling historical southwestern China 
through literature reading. The historical documents Ruey referred to for 
more than half a century were all authored by Han-Chinese writers. Ruey's 
kind of ethnohistory is actually a research methodology for figuring out 
ethnic names in a particular published or hand-written work. To summarise, 
Ruey re-created a non-Han's world in southern and southwestern China. We 
learn how an ethnographic world is constructed through discussing Ruey's 
works, and also understand the way of deconstructing it, by 'anatomising' 
the body of his ethnological achievement.


For more information about this and other issues of INNER ASIA, visit:
http://www.erica.demon.co.uk

ON-LINE PUBLICATION- The Nationalities Question in Post-Soviet Kazakhstan

Posted by: Natsuko Oka <oka(a)ide.go.jp>
Posted: 18 Jun 2002


The Middle East Series No. 51 "The Nationalities Question in Post-Soviet 
Kazakhstan" is now available on the Institute of Developing Economies web 
site at http://www.ide.go.jp/English/Publish/Mes/51.html

Since we posted an announcement of this publication, we have received more 
requests than we can meet.  We apologize for those to whom we couldn't send
hard 
copies.  We beg you for understanding that libraries and research institutes 
were given preference.

Please note that the electronic version lacks page numbers for technical 
reasons.

Best wishes,
Natsuko Oka


Natsuko Oka
Area Studies Department II
Institute of Developing Economies
3-2-2, Wakaba, Mihama-ku, Chiba-shi,
Chiba 261-8545
Japan

Phone: +81(43)299-9646(direct)
Fax: +81(43)299-9731
Email: oka(a)ide.go.jp

PUBLICATION- Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs, Vol. 22, No. 1

Posted by: Sharron Lawrence <sharronl(a)tandf.co.uk>
Posted: 12 Jun 2002

 
Volume 22 Number 1/April 01, 2002 of Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs is 
now available on the Taylor and Francis web site at 
http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com.


The following URL will take you directly to the issue:

http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/link.asp?id=PLQ95RWHB2QC

This issue contains:

A Word about Ourselves
Saleha S. Mahmood
http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/link.asp?id=4QH5V2FKGYGCR3P8

Soviet Nationality, Identity, and Ethnicity in Central Asia: Historic
Narratives and Kazakh Ethnic Identity
Saulesh Esenova
http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/link.asp?id=MKJYPWPWUR74HMA0

Tajikistan: Nationalism, Ethnicity, Conflict, and Socio-economic
Disparities--Sources and Solutions
Payam Foroughi
http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/link.asp?id=0DWTMWGKNUGXGMJ3

The Karachay Struggle after the Deportation
Walter Comins-Richmond
http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/link.asp?id=AHE6YE0W0BJTUFDA

Repossessing Kazan as a Form of Nation-building in Tatarstan, Russia
Helen M. Faller
http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/link.asp?id=AWX0DLDAU2AQ2JRH

Political Movements and Leverage Points: Kurdish Activism in the
European Diaspora
Vera Eccarius-Kelly
http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/link.asp?id=1L1CQRY1E18LFC4T

Racism in Turkey: The Case of Huseyin Nihal Atsiz
Umut Uzer
http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/link.asp?id=WBTYF6WQ9MH7C2B6

Arab/Muslim 'Otherness': The Role of Racial Constructions in the Gulf
War and the Continuing Crisis with Iraq
Sina Ali Muscati
http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/link.asp?id=6675LBVFU8MR4ETP

Muslim Martial Arts in China: Tangping (Washing Cans) and
Self-defence
Helena Hallenberg
http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/link.asp?id=JL2TPNW04PWQH88Q

Islam in Lithuania: Changing Patterns of Religious and Social Life of
Lithuanian Muslims
Egdunas Racius
http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/link.asp?id-BTPX2UJ8QB3WP4

Islamic Law and Judicial Practice in Nigeria: An Historical
Perspective
Allan Christelow
http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/link.asp?idóJ438MU1RA631T5

Bosnia-Herzegovina: Developments towards a More Integrated State?
Florian Bieber
http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/link.asp?id'G0HTDN7GYXGDBK

Muslims and Religious Pluralism in Post-Apartheid South Africa
Imam A. Rashied Omar
http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/link.asp?id=T4NRUJ4618RM3H3D

South African Political Islam: A Preliminary Approach towards Tracing
the Call of Islam's Discourse(s) of Struggle
Iqbal Jhazbhay
http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/link.asp?id=H0K2QGG5JMAC8RQM

Book Reviews
http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/link.asp?id=TPDQPPQA0JTHB3RK

To subscribe to this journal, please email: JaneD(a)tandf.co.uk

JOURNAL- Special Issue: Nationalims and the Colonial Legacy, IJMES

Posted by: Alissa Surges - IJMES <asurges(a)umich.edu>
Posted: 10 Jun 2002


Table of Contents

SPECIAL ISSUE, May 2002

Nationalism and the Colonial Legacy in the Middle East and Central Asia

Guest Co-editor: Deniz Kandiyoti

Introduction, Juan Cole and Deniz Kandiyoti

Identity and the Colonial Experience

Sami Zubaida, The Fragments Imagine the Nation: The Case of Iraq

Mohamad Tavakoli-Targhi, From Patriotism to Matriotism: A Tropology of 
Iranian Nationalism, 1870-1909

Nodira A. Abdurakhimova, The Colonial System of Power in Turkestan

Marianne Kamp, Pilgrimage and Performance: Uzbek Women and the Imagining of 
Uzbekistan in the 1920s

Nationalism and Postcolonialism

Deniz Kandiyoti, Post-colonialities Compared? Potentials and Limitations in 
the Middle East and Central Asia

Anthony Hyman, Nationalism in Afghanistan

Alisher Ilkhamov, Nation-State Formation: Features of Social Stratification 
in the Late Soviet Era

Busra Ersanli, History Textbooks as Reflections of the Political Self: 
Turkey (1930s and 1990s) and Uzbekistan (1990s)

Tyntchtykbek Tchoraev, Historiography of Post-Soviet Kyrgyzstan

Book Reviews

Islamic Thought

Hamid Dabashi, Truth and Narrative: The Untimely Thoughts of 'Ayn al-Qudat 
al-Hamadhani (Ali Asghar Seyed-Gohrab)

Gerald T. Elmore, Islamic Sainthood in the Fullness of Time: Ibn al-'Arabi's 
Book of the Fabulous Gryphon (Omid Safi)

Carl W. Ernst, Ruzbihan Baqli: Mysticism and the Rhetoric of Sainthood in 
Persian Sufism (Ali Asghar Seyed-Gohrab)

Tamara Sonn, Interpreting Islam: Bandali Jawzi's Islamic Intellectual 
History (Shukri B. Abed)

Mohammed 'Abed al-Jabri, Arab-Islamic Philosophy: A Contemporary Critique 
(Tamara Sonn)

Religious Minorities

Robert Brody, The Geonim of Babylonia and the Shaping of Medieval Jewish 
Culture (Arnold Franklin)

Heribert Busse, Islam, Judaism, and Christianity: Theological and Historical 
Affiliations (Reuven Firestone)

Nader Saiedi, Logos and Civilization: Spirit, History, and Order in the 
Writings of Baha'u'llah (Denis MacEoin)

Medieval History

Fred M. Donner, Narratives of Islamic Origins: The Beginnings of Islamic 
Historical Writing (Richard C. Martin)

Maya Shatzmiller, The Berbers and the Islamic State: The Marinid Experience 
in Pre-Protectorate Morocco (Katherine E. Hoffman)

Frédérique Soudan, Le Yémen ottoman d'après la chronique d'al-Mawa'I (Isa 
Blumi) 

Paul Wheatley, The Places Where Men Pray Together: Cities in Islamic Lands 
Seventh through the Tenth Centuries (Ira M. Lapidus)

Modern History

Thabit A. Abdullah, Merchants, Mamluks, and Murder: The Political Economy of 
Trade in Eighteenth-Century Basra (Patricia Risso)

Nina Berman, Orientalismus, Kolonialismus und Moderne: Zum Bild des Orients 
in der Deutschsprachigen Kultur um 1900 (Andrew Zimmerman)

J. Millard Burr and Robert O. Collins, Africa's Thirty Years War: Libya, 
Chad, and the Sudan 1963-1993 (Gregory W. White)

Martin Ewans, Afghanistan: A New History (Barnett R. Rubin)

Charles Issawi, Growing Up Different: Memoirs of a Middle East Scholar 
(Sevket Pamuk)

Vanessa Martin, Creating an Islamic State: Khomeini and the Making of a New 
Iran (Yann Richard)

Harald Schüler, Die türkischen Parteien und ihre Mitglieder (Gottfried 
Plagemann)

Literature

Kamran Tataloff, The Politics of Writing in Iran: A History of Modern 
Persian Literature (Mohammad Ghanoonparvar)

Contemporary Politics

Daniel Brumberg, Reinventing Khomeini: The Struggle for Reform in Iran 
(Vanessa Martin)

Fred Halliday, The World at 2000: Perils and Promises (Naeem Inayatullah)

Kristin Koptiuch, A Poetics of Political Economy in Egypt (Marsha 
Pripstein-Posusney)

Bruce B. Lawrence, Shattering the Myth: Islam Beyond Violence (Patrick Gaffney)

Stephen Pelletière, Iraq and the International Oil System: Why America Went 
to War in the Gulf (Isam al Khafaji)

Comments

Robert Olson on Hakan Özoglu's "Nationalism and Kurdish Notables in the Late 
Ottoman-Early Republican Era" (33:3, 383-409)

Rejoinder

Hakan Özoglu on Robert Olson's comments

PUBLICATION- Journal of Central Asian Studies, Vol. IV, No. 1

Posted by: Reuel Hanks <hreuel(a)okstate.edu>
Posted: 10 Jun 2002


Vol. IV., no.1 of the Journal of Central Asian Studies is now available.  
Subscription to JCAS is $25 for individuals, $40 for institutional 
subscribers, and is tax-deductible.  Checks should be drawn on a U.S. bank 
and sent to Dr. John Dunn, History, ABAC 47, Tifton, Georgia, 31794 
USA--please make payable to AACAR.  JCAS is a peer-reviewed journal and 
welcomes submissions on Central Asia from the social sciences and humanities.

Articles for consideration should be sent to Dr. Reuel Hanks, Editor, JCAS, 
211 Scott Hall, OSU, Stillwater, OK  74078, USA, or may be submitted as an 
e-mail attachment to hreuel(a)okstate.edu.  Submissions must be as MSWORD 
files, and articles must be documented using endnotes.

For additional information on style, please contact the editor or visit the 
JCAS website at:

http://www.geog.okstate.edu/jounals/jcas/jcas.htm

Vol. IV., No. 1
Contents:

Articles:
Armenian Energy: Establishing or Eroding Sovereignty?
Shannon O'Lear

Indo-Central Asian Contacts: A Study of the Turkoman Initiative in the 
Medieval Period
R. L. Hangloo

Forgotten in Central Asia: The Dynamics of Trade in the Xinjiang-Uigur
Autonomous Republic
Martin C. Spechler

Research Notes:

Two American Reports on Life in Mongolia in World War II
Gary Leiser


Book Reviews

Adeeb Khalid, The Politics of Muslim Cultural Reform:  Jadidism in Central Asia
Reviewed by Cengiz Surucu

Shirin Akiner, Sander Tideman and Jon Hay, eds., Sustainable Development in 
Central Asia
Reviewed by Simon Heap

Mikhail Alexandrov, Uneasy Alliance: Relations between Russia and Kazakhstan 
in the Post-Soviet Era, 1992-1997
Reviewed by Beate Eschment

PUBLICATION- Central Asia and the Caucasus, 2002 No. 3

Posted by: Murad Esenov <murad(a)communique.se>
Posted: 5 Jun 2002


Dear Colleagues,

I bring to your attention the contents of the third issue (Volume 15, no. 
3) of the journal "Central Asia and the Caucasus" (in English and Russian).  
It will be published in late June.  To inquire about more details, as well 
as to subscribe, please contact:

Murad Esenov
Central Asia and the Caucasus IAC
Sweden
tel./fax: (46) 920 620 16
e-mails:
murad(a)communique.se
murad.esenov(a)bredband.net
http://www.ca-c.org


CENTRAL ASIA AND THE CAUCASUS
Journal of Social and Political Studies
No. 3 (15), 2002

IN THIS ISSUE:

REGIONAL POLITICS

Mariam Arunova. The CIS: Summing up the Past Decade and Future Prospects

Constantine Dmitriev, Mark Eaton. The Transcaspian after 11 September, 2001

Irina Komissina. Will Japan and the Caucasus Be Linked by the Silk Route?

Teimuraz Gochitashvili, Roman Gotsiridze. Georgia: Blue Fuel as a lever of 
Regional Policy

Aigul Kosherbaeva, Iekaterina Andriushina, Gulnaz Aldibekova. Kazakhstan and
Its Entry into the World Trade Organization

David Preiger, Irina Maliarchuk, Viacheslav Dutchak. The Ukrainian Part of
the Eurasian Oil Transportation Corridor: Yesterday and Today. What about
Tomorrow?

David Shahnazarian. Nagorno Karabakh Conflict: Ten Years of Regulation

CIVIL SOCIETY

Ashurboi Imomov. Forming a Civil Society in Tajikistan: Problems and
Arguments

SPECIAL FEATURE
Central Asia and the Caucasus: Religion in the Sociopolitical Context

Leonid Sjukijainen. Islam vs. Islam. On Islamic Alternative to Extremism and
Terrorism

Orozbek Moldaliev. Islamism and International Terrorism: A Threat of Islam
or a Threat to Islam?

Igor Dobaev. On the Typology of the Radical Islamic Movements

Valentina Kurganskaia. New Spiritual Trends in Kazakhstan

Iakov Trofimov. The Catholic Church in Kazakhstan

Erkin Kurmanov. Hizb ut-Tahrir in Kyrgyzstan

Kiemiddin Sattori. Tajik Press about the Youth and Islam

Bakhodir Musaev. Islam in Uzbekistan: Creative Potential and Visible Threats

Rafik Aliev. Religion in Independent Azerbaijan

Giga Chikhladze, Irakli Chikhladze. Is Georgia Moving from Religious
Pluralism to Religious Extremism?

MASS MEDIA

Eka Kvesitadze. The Georgian Press Today

REGIONAL ECONOMIES

Pyotr Makievskiy, Kholnazar Mukhabbatov. Tajikistan: Problems of and
Prospects for the Mountain Regions (from the Standpoint of Sustainable
Development)

Sergei Kamenev. Turkmenistan's Economy Today

Shakhnoza Turaeva. The Stages and Logic of Privatization in Uzbekistan


FOR YOUR INFORMATION

The Special Feature section in the next issue will discuss:
Central Asia and the Caucasus

 - Antiterrorist Campaign of the West and Its Impact on the Local
   Situation

 - Power and Elections

 - Russia and the West: Cooperation or Competition?

If you are interested to go into more details about the content of the
articles you may find all necessary information on our Internet home-page:
http://www.ca-c.org

PUBLICATION- ISAR in Focus, ISAR's Newsletter

Posted by: Tamara Kowalski <tamara(a)isar.org> 
Posted: 3 Jun 2002 


ISAR: INITIATIVE FOR SOCIAL ACTION AND RENEWAL IN EURASIA is pleased to announce the Spring issue 
of its quarterly newsletter, ISAR in Focus In this issue of ISAR in Focus ISAR's 
deputy director, Kate Watters, describes her first trip to Iran for ISAR's Caspian 
Program. As a littoral state to the Caspian Sea, Iran is an important -- and often 
neglected --partner in working to protect the sea. Read about her impressions of 
the trip and joint activities with ISAR's new contacts. The newsletter also looks 
at ISAR-Azerbaijan's second annual NGO conference in Baku, and ISAR-Siberia's Rivers 
Conference held in Novosibirsk. We also include an update of ISAR-Belarus' activities, 
and some of the successes of our grantees across Central Asia. ISAR promotes citizen 
participation in the former Soviet Union by supporting grassroots activists and 
community-based nongovernmental organizations in their efforts to create just and 
sustainable societies. ISAR in Focus spotlights news from ISAR's eight field offices 
in the former Soviet Union and offers updates about their successes during the last 
quarter. ISAR offices are located in Baku, Azerbaijan; Almaty and Atyrau, Kazakhstan; 
Moscow, Novosibirsk and Vladivostok, Russia; Kyiv, Ukraine; and the newest addition 
in Minsk, Belarus. To receive a copy of ISAR in Focus, please contact Tamara Kowalski 
(tamara(a)isar.org). ISAR in Focus is also available on-line and in .pdf format from 
<http://www.isar.org>. The Web site includes information on ISAR's programs 
and an article archive of: Give & Take: A Journal on Civil Society in Eurasia, 
ISAR's quarterly journal; Surviving Together, the predecessor of Give & Take; 
and ISAR in Focus. BECOME A MEMBER! Your tax-deductible membership of $35 ($50 for 
institutions) supports our programmatic work and public outreach efforts. Membership 
includes a one-year subscription to Give & Take and ISAR in Focus, and invitations 
to our forums and brownbags. To join ISAR, please send your name, mailing address 
and e-mail, along with your check made payable to ISAR to: ISAR Membership, 1601 
Connecticut Ave, NW, Suite 301, Washington, DC 20009. OR JOIN ONLINE! ISAR can now 
receive your membership request and payment online and by credit card. Simply go 
to <http://www.isar.org> and click the Donate Now button at the bottom of 
the screen. 

PUBLICATION- Geopolitics of Central Asia in the Post-Cold War Era

Posted by: Mehmet Tutuncu sota(a)wanadoo.nl.gt
Posted: 3 Jun 2002


Geopolitics of Central Asia in the Post-Cold War Era: A Systemic Analysis
edited by Ertan Efegil
ISBN: 90-804409-8-1
Publisher: SOTA
Research Center for Turkestan and Azerbaijan, Haarlem, Holland, 2002 (June  
  2002)
Total page: app 570 
Cost: $35.00 plus P&amp;H 
Address to order: SOTA Postbus 9642 2003, LP Haarlem The Netherlands
Fax: + 31 23 5292883; E-mail: &lt;sota(a)wanadoo.nl&gt; TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction PART I New World Order, Geopolitics and New Great Game Debating the New World Order: Global Governance vs. Multipolarity Ertan Efegil Balance of Influence: Fallout from a Changing International System? Benny Wahlberg Geopolitical Importance of Central Asia in the Post - Cold War era: A Perspective from Uzbekistan Shukhrat Ganiev Seeking Alliance by Russia and China against USA (NATO) and Its Implications to Turkey Mehmet Aça Orta Asya Üzerine Güç Mücadelesi: Rusya ve Türkiye'nin Baskin Güç Olma Iddialari Ercan Sancak PART II Conflicting Policies of the Great Powers and Turkey Rusya'nin Kafkasya Siyasetinin Temel Noktalari Aydin Ibrahimov "The Turkish Threat" as a Domestic Policy Factor in Contemporary Russia and Its Foreign Policy Implications Anastasia Mitrofanova Turkey's Influence on the Central Asian States in the Post - Cold War Era Keith Leitich Turkish Policy in South Caucasus Bülent Aras Rise of Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) in Eurasia: Is it an effective tool in a new big game? Idris Bal ABD'nin Orta Asya Politikasi Idris Bal The Right of Free Passage and Montreux Regime Mesut Hakki Casin Russia and The European Union: An Economic and Strategic Partnership Elif Hatun Kiliçbeyli EU Political Conditionality: Formulation, Application and Evaluation of EU Political Conditionality in Central and Eastern Europe, Cyprus, Turkey and the Russian Federation Larissa Ogertschnig PART III Nationalism, Integration, Terrorism and Economy Turkestan Reconsidered: Post - Soviet Dilemmas Pinar Akcali Forces of Integration and Disintegration in Central Asia in the Post - Cold War era Rafis Abazov Nationalism and Islam in Central Asia: "Truths" or "Fantasies" on Modern Nation Yilmaz Çolak Manipulating Central Asia: The Question of Security Tamara Makarenko Bölgesel Iktisadi Bütünlesme Çabalari Çerçevesinde Bagimsiz Devletler Toplulugu'nun Degerlendirilmesi Savas Genç The Estimation of Growth Effects of Regional Economic Integration between Turkey and New Turkic Republics by Using Fixed Effect Technique (1991 - 1998) Bayram Güngör Dis Ticaret Iliskileri ve Yatirimlar Açisindan Azerbaycan - Türkiye Iliskilerinin Mevcut Durumunun Degerlendirilmesi Gubad Ibadoglu The Paradigm Clash in Central Asia: Diverging Approaches of the Japanese and the World Bank Perspective to the Development Issue for the Countries in Transition Ibrahim Öztürk

PUBLICATION- The TOL Annual Survey 2001 of the Post-Communist Region

Posted by: Jeremy Druker <drukerj(a)tol.cz>
Posted: 30 May 2002


Transitions Online (TOL), a nonprofit Internet magazine and media 
development NGO, is proud to present the TOL Annual Survey--the most 
thorough guide to the countries of Central and Eastern Europe, the Balkans, 
and the former Soviet Union. This reference tool presents a detailed 
overview of the year's events in post-communist societies and provides rich 
background analysis on all 28 countries in the region.

The Annual Survey CD-ROM includes:

 - Extensive year-in-review reports on each country written by regional experts
 - Detailed statistical data on each country
 - Several political and relief maps for each country
 - Hundreds of links to related online media sites with descriptions
 - "Best of TOL" articles for each country from 2001
 - An easy-to-use navigation system that runs on any computer

The TOL Annual Survey 2001 is an invaluable reference resource for all 
institutional and personal libraries.

For more information and to see a demonstration go to the newly launched

TOL Store http://store.tol.cz


Jeremy Druker
Director and Editor in Chief
Transitions Online: Intelligent Eastern Europe
http://www.tol.cz
Chlumova 22, 130 00 Praha 3
Czech Republic
420 2 2278-0805 (phone)
420 2 2278-0804 (fax)

PUBLICATION- Turkic Republics after 10 Years of Independence (in Turkish)

Posted by: Mehmet Tutuncu <sota(a)wanadoo.nl>
Posted: 28 May 2002


We are pleased to announce the publication of the following book in Turkish. 
To order the book you can write to <sota(a)WANADOO.NL> or send a fax to: + 31
23 529 28 83


BAGIMSIZLIKLARININ 10. YILINDA TURK CUMHURIYETLERI
(TURKIC REPUBLICS AFTER 10 YEARS OF INDEPENDECE)
AZERBAYCAN-KAZAKISTAN-KIRGIZISTAN-TURKMENISTAN-OZBEKISTAN

Yayima hazirlayanlar (editors):
Prof. Dr. Emine GURSOY-NASKALI
Erdal SAHIN

ISBN 90-804409-7-3
693s. 
Birinci Baski, 2002, Haarlem, Hollanda
First Published in 2002, Haarlem, Netherlands
TURQUOISE SERIES / TURKUAZ DIZISI: 8

CONTENTS / ICINDEKILER

ONSOZ
Emine GURSOY-NASKALI

GENEL BAKIS

ORTA ASYA TURK CUMHURIYETLERININ BAGIMSIZLIK DONEMI TEMEL SORUNLARINA
GENEL BIR BAKIS
Pinar AKCALI

TURKIC REPUBLICS TEN YEARS ON: TRANSITIONAL FACTORS FOR CONSIDERATION
Leonard A STONE

SOVYET SONRASINDA YENI BAGIMSIZ TURK CUMHURIYETLERI: SORUNLAR VE
GERCEKLER
Aydin IBRAHIMOV
Selver OZOZEN

KIMLIK POLITIKALARI

BAGIMSIZ TURK CUMHURIYETLERINDE DIL POLITIKALARI
Emine GURSOY-NASKALI

TURK CUMHURIYETLERINDE LATIN ALFABESINE GECIS CALISMALARI VE SONUCLAR
Erdal IAHIN

KAZAKISTAN CUMHURIYETININ DIL SIYASETINE SOSYO-LENGUISTIK BIR YAKLAIIM
Bilgehan AtsIz GOKDAG

SOVYETLER SONRASI KAZAKISTAN LEKSIKOLOJISINDEKI DEGISIKLIKLER
Almagul ISINA

SEMBOLLER VE SLOGANLAR

BAGIMSIZ TURK CUMHURIYETLERININ MILLI MARSLARI
Zekeriya BASARSLAN
Erdal SAHIN

SLOGANLAR VE MILLIYETCILIK: OZBEKISTAN ÖRNEGI
Ahmet Salih BICAKCI

TURKCULUK, MILLIYETCILIK

TURKISM AS AN IDEOLOGY AND POLITICS IN THE NEW TURKIC STATES AND IN THE
TURKIC REPUBLICS OF THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION: THE HOPES, DISAPPOINTMENTS
AND CONTRADICTIONS OF THE LAST DECADE
Svetlana M. TCHERVONNAIA

TURKIYE'NIN DIS ILISKILERINDE TURKCULUK VE AVRASYA
Busra ERSANLI

AVRASYACI YAKLASIMIN TURKIYE CESITLENMELERI VE TURK DÜNYASININ GELECEGI
Mehmet ACA

RUSYA FAKTORU

BAGIMSIZLIGIN 10. YILINDA TURK DUNYASI'NDA RUSYA FAKTORU
Nadir DEVLET

YELTSIN (1990-1999) VE PUTIN (2000-) DONEMINDE RUSYA FEDERASYONUNUN ORTA
ASYA POLITIKASI
Esra HATIPOGLU*

PUTIN'IN AZERBAYCAN ZIYARETI VE AZERBAYCAN RUSYA ILISKILERI
Eyup ZENGIN
Rovsen IBRAHIMOV

ABD PERSPEKTIFI

THE US PERSPECTIVE ON THE TURKIC REPUBLICS: FROM ECONOMICS TO GEOPOLITCS
Roger KANGAS

ABD'NIN TURK CUMHURIYETLERINE YONELIK POLITIKASI
Idris BAL

ETKILESIMLER

AZERBAYCAN CUMHURIYETININ KURULUSU: IRAN'DAKI AZERILER ÜZERINDE ETKISI
Brenda SHAFFER

UIGHUR MINORITY IN INDEPENDENT KAZAKHSTAN AND THE EFFECT OF KAZAKHSTAN'S
INDEPENDENCE ON THE UIGHUR MINORITY OF CHINA
Galina S. BARATOVA

BASIN, MEDYA VE SANSUR

TURK CUMHURIYETLERINDE MEDYA
Mehmet BINAY

BAGIMSIZLIKLARININ 10. YILINDA TURK CUMHURIYETLERINDE BASIN
Timur KOCAOGLU

TARIH ANLAYISI

TURK CUMHURIYETLERINDE TARIH ANLAYISI
Ahmet TASAGIL

THE NEW REPUBLICS OF CENTRAL ASIA: AN ITALIAN PERCEPTION
Maurizio PISTOSO

YAPILANMA, YONETIM VE MESRUIYET

TURKLERDE YONETIM KULTURU: AZERBAYCAN'DA DEVLET, LIDERLIK VE MESRUIYET
Ceylan TOKLUOGLU

AZERI ULUSAL KIMLIGININ YAPILANDIRILMASINDAKI SORUNLAR
Ayla GOL

KAZAKISTAN'DA SIYASAL BUTUNLESME VE ULUS-DEVLET OLMA SURECI
Erhan BUYUKAKINCI

KAZAK SIYASI SISTEMININ MODERNLESME SURECI VE ALAS HAREKETI
Ibrahim KALKAN

OZBEKISTAN'DA DEMOKRATIKLESME
Mehmet TUTUNCU*

AZERBAYCAN'DA KAMU YÖNETIMINDE YEREL YÖNETIMLERE ILISKIN DEMOKRATIK
GELISMELER
Kamil Ufuk BILGIN
Murteza HESENOV

CUMHURIYETLERIN DIS POLITIKALARI

TURK DEVLETLERININ AVRASYA JEOPOLITIGINDE YENI STRATEJIK VIZYONU VE
ISBIRLIGI BOYUTLARI
Mesut Hakki CASIN

AZERBAYCAN'IN DIS POLITIKASI
Kamer KASIM

ORTA ASYA TURK CUMHURIYETLERI ARASINDAKI ENTEGRASYON VE DEZENTEGRASYON:
BUGUN VE GELECEGE BAKIS
Colibay ELTAZAROV

ULUSLARARASI SIYASETTE TURKMENISTAN'IN YENI ROLU
Ertan EFEGIL

AZERBAYCAN'IN ISGALI VE MULTECILER

AZERBAYCAN'IN BAGIMSIZLIGININ 10. YILINDA HOCALI OLAYLARININ
DEGERLENDIRILMESI
Nesrin SARIAHMETOGLU*

BAGIMSIZLIGININ ONUNCU YILINDA AZERBAYCAN'DA KACGIN VE MECBURI
GÖCGÜNLERIN PROBLEMLERI
Okan YESILOT

ENERJI

ORTA ASYA VE KAFKASLARDA ENERJI KAYNAKLARININ STRATEJIK ÖNEMI VE PETROL
POLITIKALARI
A. Necdet PAMIR

ARTILARIYLA BAKU-CEYHAN BORU HATTI
Mensur AKGUN

EKONOMI

POST-KOMUNIST GECIS SURECINDE DUNYADA VE ORTA ASYA TURK
CUMHURIYETLERINDE EKONOMIK KALKINMA CABALARI VE SONUCLARI
Bayram GUNGOR


ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENTS IN KAZAKHSTAN AFTER TEN YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE
Turhan TURGUT

OZBEKISTAN EKONOMISI: YAPISAL DEGISIM VE ULUSLARARASI EKONOMIK
ILISKILERI (1992 - 2000 YIllarI)
Elif Hatun KILICBEYLI

AZERBAYCAN'DA UYGULANAN ISTIKRAR POLITIKASI VE ENFLASYON
Ercan SANCAK

GEÇIS EKONOMILERINDE KAYITDISI EKONOMI: NEDENLERI, BOYUTLARI VE
SONUÇLARI
Adem KALCA
Bayram GUNGOR

SANAT, FELSEFE, EDEBIYAT

AZERBAYCAN PLASTIK SANATLARINA BIR BAKIS
Vefa EFENDIZADE

ÇAGDAS AZeRBAYCAN EDEBIYYATININ VE EDEBIYYATSINASLIGININ ESAS
ISTIGAMETLERI
Tahire MEMMED

AZERBAYCAN EDEBIYYATI POSTSOVET MEKANINDA
Rahile GEYBULLAYEVA

CAGDAS AZERBAYCAN SIIRINDE OZGURLUK KONUSU
Mehmet ISMAIL

BILIMSEL ARASTIRMALAR VE ILISKILER

BAGIMSIZLIGININ 10. YILINDA AZERBAYCAN'DA BILIMSEL ARASTIRMALARIN DURUMU
Hacali NECEFOGLU

KAZAKISTAN ILE TURKIYE CUMHURIYETI ARASINDAKI KULTUR, SANAT, EGITIM VE
ILMI ILISKILER
Nursulu IMAIOVA

TURKIYE'NIN ORTA ASYA'YA YONELIK PERFORMANSINI OLCME PROBLEMLERI
Meryem KIRIMLI


© Copyright 2001, SOTA
(Research Centre for Turkestan, Azerbaijan, Crimea, Caucasus and Siberia)
Publisher:  SOTA Vakfi
Postbus 9642
2003 LP Haarlem
Netherlands
Tel./fax: + 31 23 529 28 83
E-mail: <sota(a)wanadoo.nl>
Website: <http://www.turkiye.net/sota/sota.html>


Other Publications from SOTA:

TURQUOISE SERIES / TURKUAZ DIZISI
Series Editor: Mehmet Tutuncu

1. Caucasus War and Peace, Mehmet Tutuncu (ed.) (1998)
2. Turkey and Atatürk's Legacy, Paul Henze (1998)
3. Hazar Berisi, Atilla Jorma (1999)
4. Discrimination and Conflict Türkkaya Ataöv (2000)
5. Turkish Jewish Encounters, Studies on Turkish Jewish relations Through
   the Ages, Mehmet Tutuncu (ed.) (2001)
6. Reform and Revolution in Turkestan / Turkistanda Yenilikler ve Reform
   (Osman Hocaoglu Armagani) Timur Kocaoglu ed. (2001)
7. Pax Ottomana, Studies in memoriam Prof. dr. Nejat Goyunc, Kemal Cicek
   (ed.) (2001)
8. Bagimsiliklarinin 10. Yilinda Turk Cumhuriyetleri, Emine Gursoy-Naskali,
   Erdal Sahin (eds.), (2002)
9. Geopolitics of Central Asia, A systemic Analysis, Ertan Efegil (ed) (2002)

PUBLICATION- Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst, 22 May 2002 Issue on Web

Posted by: Svante Cornell <svante.cornell(a)pcr.uu.se>
Posted: 27 May 2002


The 22 May 2002 Issue of the Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst, a subscription 
free Web journal with over 104,000 visitors to the site since November 1999 
is now on-line at http://www.cacianalyst.org/

The Central Asia-Caucasus Institute of The Johns Hopkins University-The 
Nitze School of Advanced International Studies is proud to announce the 
publication of the 22 May 2002 issue of its biweekly Web-Journal, The 
Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst.

The Institute also offers its readers the option of downloading The Analyst 
in PDF format, enabling readers to view and print out the entire issue of 
The Analyst. The html version will, of course, remain available.

THE ANALYTICAL ARTICLES INCLUDE:

THE SHANGHAI COOPERATION ORGANIZATION AND ITS FUTURE
Stephen Blank
In the war on terrorism the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) or 
Shanghai-6 has been AWOL.  Its failure to act effectively in this war not 
only highlights its failure to be a meaningful regional provider of security 
in Central Asia, it also reflects the erosion of Sino-Russian cooperation 
and the continuing failure of Central Asian states to devise a viable 
regional security mechanism.  Thus it is not surprising that the Central 
Asian states have invited America into the region or that this presence 
alarms both China and Russian opponents of President Putin's current support 
for it.  But it remains an open question as to whether external providers 
will continue to be necessary for the long-term provision of security 
against the multiple challenges to Central Asian governments and societies.

THE LOYA JIRGA AND THE WAY TO A SOLUTION TO THE AFGHAN GOVERNMENT CRISIS
Azmat Hayat Khan
In the tribal Afghan society, the most successful leaders have been 
traditional leaders, but for the past twenty years, governments - be they 
Communist, Mujahideen or Taliban - have attempted to employ nontraditional 
policies, and have failed. The current crisis will not be rectified until a 
new political strategy is adopted that is closely related to traditional 
institutions and has a large amount of tribal involvement. To convene a Loya 
Jirga is the only possible solution to create a legitimate government 
because it stays close to tradition and allows all tribes to voice their 
opinions.

ENERGY INTERESTS, THE U.S. GOVERNMENT, AND THE POST-TALIBAN TRANS-AFGHAN 
PIPELINE
Ron Callari
Construction of oil and natural gas pipelines through Afghanistan was under 
serious consideration during the Clinton years. In 1996, Unocal won a 
contract to build a 1,005-mile pipeline in an effort to exploit the vast 
Turkmenistan natural gas fields. The pipeline would extend through 
Afghanistan and Pakistan, terminating at Multan, with a proposed 400-mile 
extension into India. The project was halted when the Taliban regime became 
unmanageable.  President Bush appointed Zalmay Khalilzad, a former Unocal 
consultant, as his special envoy to Afghanistan. Today, the US desire to 
control fossil fuel in this region is paramount in how the energy sector is 
influencing the Bush administration's policies in Afghanistan and Central Asia.

KYRGYZ TURMOIL OVER A BORDER AGREEMENT
Anara Tabyshalieva
According to two agreements signed by President Askar Akayev of Kyrgyzstan 
and Chairman Jiang Zemin of China in 1996 and 1999, Kyrgyzstan cedes about 
125,000 hectares of land to China. The opposition accused the President of 
signing these agreements without consulting Parliament, violating the 
constitution.  After six demonstrators were killed and 29 by police in the 
Jalal-Abad region in March, tensions increased between all involved groups, 
together with and under-the-rug struggle for power in the capital. Thorny 
border issues could be fueled by mass discontent in the economic and social 
spheres. Disastrous living standards, pandemic unemployment, increasing 
electricity fees, combined with poor governance and corruption, could push 
demonstrators to spontaneous and impulsive actions. unless a dialogue 
between the government and its opponents can be found.

THE FIELD REPORTS INCLUDE:

KYRGYZ STATE COMMISSION RELEASES ITS REPORT
The state commission that had been investigating the Aksy events released 
its report on May 18.  The report points out the main causes of the tragedy, 
on the basis of which the Commission makes nine suggestions including the 
suggestion to President Askar Akayev considering personal responsibility of 
several senior state officials for the events.

THE GEORGIAN LOCAL ELECTIONS: CAMPAIGNING TO NO AVAIL
The local election campaign has dominated politics in Georgia for the last 
few weeks, and has been plagued by a struggle for control over the formerly 
ruling Citizen's Union of Georgia Party. Four main parties are leading the 
polls, but none looks likely to poll even 15%.

PEACEFUL INITIATIVES IN THE ARMENIA-AZERBAIJAN CONFLICT
The world community is revitalizing efforts to settle the Armenia-Azerbaijan 
conflict and to normalize relations between Yerevan and Baku on the one 
hand, and between Yerevan and Ankara on the other. Between 13 and 15 May, 
two meetings were held almost simultaneously in order to pursue these aims 
in Prague and in Reykjavik.

KAZAKHSTAN LAUNCHES A PROGRAM TO BOOST RURAL ECONOMY
The most hardly hit by unemployment, depleted infrastructure, worsening 
educational standards, low income and other concomitants of the economic 
changes in Kazakhstan was the rural population. The utter pauperization of 
people of rural areas have always been the trump card in the hands of the 
opposition. Now the leaders of the country seem to realize that rural areas 
can no longer be ignored.


The Analyst provides a rigorous, concise and nonpartisan forum where 
specialists can assess issues and events in the Central Asia-Caucasus region 
for a broad audience of business people, journalists, policy makers, 
government officials, diplomats and academics.  The Analyst seeks regional 
specialists, journalists, economists, and political scientists to join its 
pool of authors who are then asked to contribute short, timely, analytical 
articles, ca. 900-1000 words in length. The institute pays a honorarium to 
the authors. The Analyst also seeks local experts, corporate representatives 
and NGO representatives from the region to write Field Reports for a modest 
honorarium.

The Analyst provides factual, objective and analytical articles valuing 
fresh insights rather than the conventional wisdom.  We welcome readers and 
writers from various perspectives and viewpoints.  We value your comments 
and suggestions.

Those interested in joining The Analyst's pool of authors to contribute 
articles, field reports or contacts of potential writers, please send your 
CV to: svante.cornell(a)pcr.uu.se and suggest some topics on which you would 
like to write. Please remember that The Analyst does not accept double 
submissions.


Svante E. Cornell, Acting Editor
Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst
Central Asia-Caucasus Institute
The Johns Hopkins University
Nitze School of Advanced International Studies
1619 Massachusetts Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20036
Tel. 1-202-663-7712
Fax. 1-202-663-7785
svante.cornell(a)pcr.uu.se

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS- Central Asia Fiction

Posted by: Central Asia Fiction <cafeditor(a)yahoo.com>
Posted: 19 May 2002


Greetings from Central Asia Fiction! http://cenasia-fiction.netfirms.com

NEW STORIES AND AN EXPANDED CENTRAL ASIAN PHOTO GALLERY!

The CAF website has just been updated. Come see what's new!

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS! CALL FOR PHOTOS!

CAF seeks new short stories about Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan,
Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. - CAF seeks digital
photos of all things Central Asian - people, places, cities, nature,
culture, family, holidays, and community action.

SEND SUBMISSIONS TO: cafeditor(a)yahoo.com

Warmest regards, CAF Editor


Erik Blender
Editor - Central Asia Fiction
cafeditor(a)yahoo.com
http://cenasia-fiction.netfirms.com

PUBLICATION- Media Insight Central Asia, No. 23

Posted by: Andre Loersch <andre.loersch(a)cimera.org>
Posted: 14 May 2002


The latest electronic issue of Media Insight Central Asia is now available
on the web: www.cimera.org. with a special issue dedicated to broadcasting
media in Central Asia. A sample version of the complete issue can be
obtained in PDF format by sending a request to : andre.loersch(a)cimera.org

Media Insight Central Asia # 23, February 2002
(http://www.cimera.org/publications/ind_camel.htm), addresses the following
topics:

Editorial
NO PROSPECTS TODAY
FOR E-MEDIA IN CENTRAL ASIA
Journalists and media directors believe e-media development is mainly
impeded by the authorities' policy of denying access by any rivals to the
state-run broadcasters and the silent but actual media censorship and
self-censorship.
By Elmira Toktogulova, CIMERA, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

Focus: Radio and Televisions in Central Asia
ACHILLES' HEEL OF THE
KYRGYZ TV ANALYTICAL PROGRAMS
Kyrgyz TV channels ignore experts in political analysis. TV hosts use
teleprompters for texts they have neither prepared nor written, remaining
simply middlemen between the viewers and channel bosses who are imposing
their flat judgements and one-sided viewpoints on their audience.
By Igor Grebenshchikov, independent reporter, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

TAJIK GOVERNMENT WANTS TO SHARE
THE BENEFIT OF PRIVATE TV AND RADIO
Because of its monopoly media position, the Television and Radio
Broadcasting Committee, which operates under the Tajik government, does not
always respect the licensing of non-governmental television and radio
companies.
By By Rufia Abduvahidova, Media-Centre, Dushanbe

INDEPENDENCE IN EXCHANGE
FOR STATE GRANT-MAINTAINED SYSTEM
With Tajikistan political freedom and market relations still in their
infancy, some independent electronic mass media within the country are
sacrificing their independence for the state's support benefits.
By Turko Dikayev, independent reporter, Tajikistan

TAJIKISTAN HAS SWITCHED OFF
RUSSIAN TV BECAUSE OF ITS DEBTS
Russian ORT and RTR television broadcasts in Tajikistan has been restricted
and even stopped, raising discussions within the Tajik media. Local experts
believe that the main reason for these measures is not really the Russian's
debts, but rather the Tajik government's attempt to stop broadcasts by
anyone not under their control.
By Nargis Zakirova, journalist, Tajikistan

NEW CONSTRAINTS FOR
BROADCASTERS  IN UZBEKISTAN
In October 2001, the Uzbek Government brought in a policy that indirectly
impeds the development of the domestic telecom market. This policy, to raise
license tariffs, particularly hurts the operations of private television
companies.
By Charos Abdullayeva, Journalist, Tashkent

UZBEKISTAN RIDES ON
THE NEW FM RADIO WAVES
Commercial non-governmental FM radio stations are popular now in Uzbekistan.
One of the factors for their success is the absence of overt editorial
censorship.  However, no radio editor will let any 'political error' be
broadcast on a show.
By Rustam Sadykov, reporter, Uzbekistan

Current events

MEDIA ADULATION: THE TAJIK
PRESIDENT ASKS TO TONE IT DOWN
The President of Tajikistan stated in an address that the media should "not
to allocate excessive attention to the President's personality." Local
journalist Gulchekhra Mansurova looks at how the republican media has
responded to this request.
By Gulchekhra Mansurova, Media Center, Dushanbe

KYRGYZSTAN PRINT SHOPS
VERSUS FREEDOM OF THE PRESS
International organisations are involved in a project to launch an
independent publishing house in Bishkek. Worried about state control in
publishing, Kyrgyzstan's media welcome this move as helping to protect
freedom of speech.
By Bermet Bukasheva, reporter, Kyrgyzstan

MASS MEDIA FREEDOM
IN TURKMENISTAN: ONLY A MIRAGE
Turkmenistan today is a country where the idea of media freedom is still
viewed largely along the same lines as it was under communism. What is
worse, over the ten years that have passed since the collapse of the Soviet
Union the country has seen a consistent policy aimed at subordinating all
news media to the needs of a totalitarian state.
By Nazik Atayeva, reporter, Turkmenistan

UZBEK OFFICIALS KINDLY SUGGEST
AN AGENDA FOR THE UZBEK MEDIA
 From this March onwards, Uzbekistan's mass media will not only have to defer
to the opinion of the State Committee for the Press censors, but also pay
heed to the chiefs at the presidential press service, who expect media to
plan and announce their content one year in advance.
By Bobomurod Abdullayev, reporter, Tashkent, Uzbekistan

AFGHAN AND UZBEKISTANI
JOURNALISTS MEET IN TERMEZ
"Unless freedom of expression and democracy are based on a strong economy
they can spark tension and conflicts in society," said reporters from
northern Afghanistan who were invited to attend a seminar in Termez,
Uzbekistan, where they met with Uzbek colleagues to discuss media
liberalisation.
By Iskandar Khamroh, journalist, Uzbekistan

 

PUBLICATION- Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst, 8 May 2002 Issue on Web

Posted by: Svante Cornell <svante.cornell(a)pcr.uu.se>
Posted: 12 May 2002



The 8 May 2002 Issue of the Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst, a subscription free
Web journal with over 104,000 visitors to the site since November 1999 is now
on-line at http://www.cacianalyst.org/

The Central Asia-Caucasus Institute of The Johns Hopkins University-The Nitze
School of Advanced International Studies is proud to announce the publication
of the 8 May 2002 issue of its biweekly Web-Journal, The Central Asia-Caucasus
Analyst.

The Institute also offers its readers the option of downloading The Analyst in
PDF format, enabling readers to view and print out the entire issue of The
Analyst. The html version will, of course, remain available.


PASHTUN DISAFFECTION: THREAT TO STABILITY IN AFGHANISTAN
Awamdost Pakhtunkhel
The fragile balance in the southern, predominantly Pashtun areas of
Afghanistan since the fall of the Taliban has recently been rocked by
conflicts of authority between regional warlords and the interim government in
Kabul. The main problem so far has centered on the three province of Paktia,
Paktika and Khost, which form the historic greater Paktia province. As has
been widely reported in the press, local strongman Bacha Khan Zardan refused
to accept the authority of a governor appointed by the interim government and
has clashed with the governor's forces.  What is less well understood is the
roots and the depth of resentment in the Pashtun areas of Southern Afghanistan
and Northwestern Pakistan, and the dire implications of this problem if left
unchecked.

TURKEY'S STRATEGIC CHOICE: EURASIANISM OR EUROPEANISM?
Ihsan D. Dagi
General Tuncer Kilinc, the secretary-general of Turkey's National Security
Council, recently shocked observers by stating that Turkey needed alternatives
to the European Union, proposing that Turkey should seek, with support of USA,
new allies in the East, namely Russia and Iran. The General argued that the EU
held negative views on Turkey, has never assisted it, and agreed that 'the EU
is a Christian Club, a neo-colonialist force, and is determined to divide
Turkey'. General Kilinc's views, though identified as personal, disclosed a
severe conflict among Turkish elites on the country's strategic choices.
Kilinc's views reflect those of a strong 'Eurasianist' school of thought
within the Turkish state.

AFGHANISTAN-BASED INTERNATIONAL DRUG-TRAFFICKING: A CONTINUED THREAT
Hooman Peimani
Bloody turf wars emerged in Afghanistan in late April. In the north, Uzbek
warlord Abdul Rashid Dostum's and Tajik warlord Atta Mohammed's forces clashed
over two towns near Mazar-e-Sharif. In the east, two Pashtun warlords, Bacha
Khan Zardan and Taj Mohammed Wardak, fought over the city of Gardez. This
recent increase in fighting hints at the persistence of a suitable ground for
international drug-trafficking in Afghanistan. The operation of this
destructive "industry" will not only have security implications for
Afghanistan and its neighbouring states, but also have a negative impact on
ethnic and tribal relations and on the consolidation of the government and the
reconstruction of the country.

THE ADYGEYA REPUBLIC: A LITMUS TEST OF RUSSIAN FEDERALISM?
Hasan Kanbolat & Suat Kiniklioglu
In the midst of the centralizing tendencies of the Putin administration in
Russia, the ethnic republics are clinging to their constitutional autonomy and
trying to preserve their sovereignty. Adygeya, where only 27% of the
population are ethnic Adygey, has been the scene of a rising Russian
nationalism that seeks to dismantle the republican status of the territory.
Some observers have rather alarmingly called Adygeya a 'second Chechnya in the
making', but the region has so far remained calm. If Moscow continues to lend
support to the Russian nationalists in Adygeya, however, the situation may
deteriorate.

THE FIELD REPORTS INCLUDE:

KURULTAI AND FORUM ON THE SUBJECT OF AKSY BLOODSHED IN KYRGYZSTAN
Two separate events discussing the Aksy bloodshed took place in Bishkek
lately, one government-sponsored and one opposition-led. Opposition figures
reiterated their far-reaching demands, while the government shows no sign of
taking serious action.

IS RUSSIA PREPARING TO SOLVE THE CASPIAN SEA PROBLEM BY FORCE?
A day after the Ashgabat talks on the Caspian sea ended in failure, Russian
President Vladimir Putin announce Russia would hold extensive military
exercises in the Caspian sea, pointing to the risk of an increased
militarization of the political situation in the Caspian sea. Azerbaijan and
Iran both voiced concern, while Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan have yet to react.

THE SPOILS OF WAR: GENEROUS DONORS FLOCK TO UZBEKISTAN
Iranian President Mohammad Khatami was the last in a lost of foreign leaders
that visited Uzbekistan and pledged financial support for the country. The
U.S., China and Turkey have all sent high-level delegations to Tashkent. The
changes in financial aid and attention reflect the changing geopolitical
configurations in the Central Asian region.

IS KYRGYZSTAN BETTER OFF?
In 2001 Kyrgyzstan officially achieved growth in key macroeconomic indicators.
According to statistical information, there was an increase in the country's
GDP, inflation dropped, the local currency kept a relatively firm exchange
rate, and there was a rise in real household incomes. However, many observers
are critical and claim nothing has improved in the economy.


The Analyst provides a rigorous, concise and nonpartisan forum where
specialists can assess issues and events in the Central Asia-Caucasus region
for a broad audience of business people, journalists, policy makers,
government officials, diplomats and academics.  The Analyst seeks regional
specialists, journalists, economists, and political scientists to join its
pool of authors who are then asked to contribute short, timely, analytical
articles, ca. 900-1000 words in length. The institute pays a honorarium to the
authors. The Analyst also seeks local experts, corporate representatives and
NGO representatives from the region to write Field Reports for a modest
honorarium.

The Analyst provides factual, objective and analytical articles valuing fresh
insights rather than the conventional wisdom.  We welcome readers and writers
from various perspectives and viewpoints.  We value your comments and
suggestions.

Those interested in joining The Analyst's pool of authors to contribute
articles, field reports or contacts of potential writers, please send your CV
to: svante.cornell(a)pcr.uu.se and suggest some topics on which you would like
to write. Please remember that The Analyst does not accept double submissions.


Svante E. Cornell, Acting Editor
Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst
Central Asia-Caucasus Institute
The Johns Hopkins University
Nitze School of Advanced International Studies
1619 Massachusetts Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20036
Tel. 1-202-663-7712
Fax. 1-202-663-7785
svante.cornell(a)pcr.uu.se

PUBLICATION- The Nationalities Question in Post-Soviet Kazakhstan

Posted by: Natsuko Oka <oka(a)ide.go.jp>
Posted: 10 May 2002


Dear Colleagues:

I would like to bring your attention to our new publication entitled "The
Nationalities Question in Post-Soviet Kazakhstan" (the Middle East Studies
Series, No. 51), Chiba, Japan: Institute of Developing Economies, 2002: 159
(see contents attached below).

Chapter one by Professor Nurbulat Masanov provides a conceptual,
theoretical, and historical context for examining ethnic identity and
ethno-politics in Kazakhstan.  His article also explores how a state
ideology is formed under the current nationalizing regime.  In chapter two,
Dr. Erlan Karin and Dr. Andrei Chebotarev examine the government policy of
so-called "kazakhization," the policy to promote the Kazakh people in
various spheres of life, among others, in state and government institutions.
My paper presented as chapter three is based on interviews with
Kazakhstan's political and cultural elites with regard to the government
nationalities policy.

We would be happy to send it to you for free (this book is not for sale).
If you are interested, please give me your mailing address.  And please feel
free to forward this information to your colleagues (please note though that
we have only a limited number of copies -- 200 -- and we may not be able to
accept all requests).

Best wishes,

Natsuko Oka
Area Studies Department II
Institute of Developing Economies
3-2-2, Wakaba, Mihama-ku, Chiba-shi,
Chiba 261-8545
Japan

Phone: +81(43)299-9646 (direct)
Fax: +81(43)299-9731
Email: oka(a)ide.go.jp


CONTENTS

Preface

Chapters

1. Perceptions of Ethnic and All-National Identity in Kazakhstan
    Nurbulat MASANOV
  - Ethnicity
  - Basic terms and concepts
  - Problem and method
  - Ethnodemographic situation in Kazakhstan
  - Kazakhs
  - Clans and zhuz
  - Kazakh language
  - Indigenous peoples, aborigines, and autochthones
  - Diasporas
  - Ethnic minorities in Kazakhstan
  - Russians and the Russian language
  - State policy
  - Interethnic relations in contemporary Kazakhstan (in lieu of a conclusion)

2. The Policy of Kazakhization in State and Government Institutions in
    Kazakhstan
    Erlan KARIN and Andrei CHEBOTAREV
  - The government's deliberate insertion of ethnic Kazakh ways of thinking
    into the republic's socio-cultural sphere
  - Tribalism in the system of state governance and administration
  - Language policy
  - Migration policy
  - Reasons behind kazakhization and the interested parties
  - Consequences of kazakhization

3. Nationalities Policy in Kazakhstan: Interviewing Political and Cultural
    Elites
    Natsuko OKA
  - Background
    Nation-building in independent Kazakhstan
    About the survey
  - Analysis of the survey
    Kazakh nationalists
    Russian nationalists
    Kazakh intellectuals
    Russian intellectuals
    Intellectuals of ethnic minorities
  - Conclusion
    Differences among and within the groups
    Possible area of compromise
  - List of interviewees
  - Sample of the questionnaire
  - References

PUBLICATION- Journal on Archaeology of the Don River Region

Posted by: Jeannine Davis-Kimball <jkimball(a)csen.org>
Posted: 9 May 2002


DONSKAIA ARKHEOLOGIIA, a journal reflecting the ancient history and
archaeology of the Don River region in southern Russia, publishes articles
in both a scientific and popular scientific genre. Here a wide rage of
questions on the archaeology of the North Caucasus and adjacent territories
are studied. The ancient Don Land was a crossroads of civilizations and
migrations and, thus, its history can be understood solely within the
context of the histories of neighboring and distant regions.

The journal is published three to four times per year. To date eleven issues
in eight volumes have been published. Each volume contains between 112-174
pages with a minimum of four pages of color illustrations. The chronological
and cultural range cover the time periods from the Paleolithic to the
Medieval. Published in Russian. Beginning with Vol. 1, 2000, the articles
have English summaries.

Past volumes beginning with Vol. 1 1998 - Vols. 1-2, 2001 are available at:

The Center for the Study of Eurasian Nomads and Zinat Press at

http://csen.org/Pubs_Sales_Reviews/Zinat.Publications.html

PUBLICATION/CFP- Journal of Arabic and Islamic Studies Print Edition

Posted by: Joseph N. Bell <joseph.bell(a)msk.uib.no>
Posted: 9 May 2002


It pleases me to announce that a contract between Edinburgh University Press
and the University of Bergen for the publication of the paper version of
JAIS plus one monograph per year has been signed. Publication will start
with volumes 1-3 (1996-97, 1998-99, and 2000) and the two monographs already
accepted. Volume 4 (2001-2002) and the next monograph will be published as
soon as they are ready. (Monographs require a subsidy of GBP 1750 for works
up to 256 pages.)

Minimally formatted versions of both the journal and the monographs (current
and future) will be allowed to remain on the Internet, providing research
results to a wide audience and to many scholars who otherwise could not
afford access to the information.

We still have some room in volume 4 (2001-2002) and volume 5 (2003) and
invite contributions. Our readers may also wish to consider submitting
longer works to the monograph series.

If an e-mail to me is rejected by our prudish server at Bergen (this happens
if your Internet provider sends out a lot of "spam" and unsolicited
pornography), mail me at:
    norme-b(a)online.no

Joseph Bell
Journal of Arabic and Islamic Studies Print Edition

PUBLICATION- Fourth Livshits Orientalist Workshop, Barnaul

Posted by: Vladimir Boyko <boyko(a)uni-altai.ru>
Posted: 30 Apr 2002


The Fourth Livshits Orientalist Workshop, 26 April 2002. The Proceedings.
Editors: V. Barmin, V. Boyko, M. Volobueva. Barnaul, 2002. - 256 p. In
Russian, with photo and English contents ISBN 5-88210-199-9

The book contains the papers submitted to Organizing Committee and presented
at IV Orientalist Workshop dedicated to the memory (and 80th anniversary) of
Solomon G.Livshits (1922-1994), whose pioneering research on regional
aspects of international relations and untiring educational activities in
the field of Oriental studies created the basis for present day school of
Central Eurasian studies in Russian Altai. The workshop was held on 26 April
2002 in Barnaul, it was organized by the Center for Regional Studies (Russia
and the East) at Barnaul State Pedagogical University under the auspices of
Altai Center of Oriental Studies.


Contents:

Solomon G. Livshits - Citizen, Scholar, and Teacher

Z. S. Ionina (Barnaul State Pedagogical University), Remembering S. G. Livshits

A. A. Prokhozhev (Barnaul State Pedagogical University). The Man of Word and
Deed

M. P. Anikin (High school # 12, Barnaul), My Teacher


The Countries of the East: Domestic Development and International Relations

A. N. Pershikov (Tomsk Polytechnic University), The Government and Trade in
Ancient East

S. M. Rubtsov (Barnaul State Pedagogical University), Sirian Shots in Mezia
and Dakya in I-III A.D.

O. V. Sheremetyev (Altai State Technical University), Arsuf Battle of 1191:
The aims of sides, its course and tactics

N. A. Retunskikh (Altai State University), "Bukhara" Factor in
Russian-Junghar Trade in XVII-XVIII

A. A. Aseev (Altai State University), New Approaches of Kazakh Scholars to
Kenesari Qasimov's Rebellion

S. V. Moiseev (Barnaul State Pedagogical University), The History of early
contacts between Russia and Yettishar in the second half of 1860s

R. M. Valeev (Kazan State University), The Traditions of Oriental Local
History in Kazan Oriental Studies XIX-early XX

V. S. Ivanova (Gorno-Altaisk State University), The Principle of Power
Division in Japan Constitution of 1889

V. G. Datsyshen (Krasnoyarsk State Pedagogical University), Chinese in Tuva.
The Lessons of the First Decade of XX

E. N. Nazemtseva (Barnaul State Pedagogical University), The Pages from the
History of White Emigration in Xinjiang (Lt-Gen A. S. Bakitsh)

T. A. Shemetova (Barnaul State Pedagogical University), Considering
Economical Situation of Turkestan region during Civil War Times

V. N. Ghuzarov (Tomsk Polytechnic University), Synthesis of Chinese
Political Thought and Western Liberal Theories in Tsung Yat Seng Ideology

Yu. N. Tikhonov (Lipetsk State Pedagogical University), Jamal-Pasha's
Activities in Organizing Military Rebellion of Pashun Border Tribes in
British India (1920-21)

V. S. Boyko (Barnaul State Pedagogical University), Indian Factor in
Russian-Afghan Relations in early 1920s

G. V. Uvarov (Lipetsk State Pedagogical University), USSR and Middle East
States in Territorial Schemes of Germany and Japan in second half of
1940-early 1942

A. S. Pakhomov (Lipetsk State Pedagogical University), S. Kripps-Muslim
League Negotiations (1942) on the Future of British India

L. A. Tshereshneva (Lipetsk State Pedagogical University), USA and the
Problem of British India's Independence (1941-47)

F. Z. Razhepaeva (Eastern Kazakhstan State University), The Resettlement of
Crimean Tartars to Kazakhstan

O. A. Omeltshenko (Altai State University), Some Aspects of Social-political
Relations Between Soviet Union and China (1949-1962)

A. V. Petrenko (Tomsk State University), Modern Historiography of "Russian
Question" in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzia

V. A. Tsherniy (Tomsk Polytechnic University), Russia and the States of
Asian-Pacific Region: the Problems of Interrelation and Collaboration

N. I. Ghuzarova (Tomsk Polytechic University), Some Problems of Social
Development of Asian-Pacific Region in Late XX

A. S. Dunditsh (Barnaul State Pedagogical University), Islamic Movement of
Uzbekistan in the Course of Anti-terrorist Campaign in Afghanistan

K. S. Romantshenko (Barnaul State Pedagogical University), Nationalism and
Islam in Political Development of Modern Turkey: Party Dimension

M. V. Ivanova (Tomsk Polytechic University), The East-relate Issues in
School Notebook "The History of Siberia"

V. V. Petrik (Tomsk Polytechnic University), Comparing Educational
Strategies in Japanese and Russian Universities

L. I. Soskovets (Tomsk Polytechnic University), The Issues of Asian-Pacific
Region in Political Studies General Course


The Issues of Siberian History and Modernity

N. Yu. Zimin (Altai State University), A. V. Burdukov: The Main Stages of
Life and Research Career

I. V. Anisimova (Altai State University), "Kazakh issue" in Altai Mining
District in 1880s -early 1890s

N. F. Ivantsova, G. N. Skorlupin (Biysk State Pedagogical University), The
Issues of Social Development of Western Siberian Countryside late XIX-1917
in Russian Historiography

A. Yu. Bykov (Altai State University), The Issues of Colonization Theory in
the Works of V. A. Tresvyatsky

N. V. Diyatshenko (Barnaul State Pedagogical University), The Role of
Siberian Region in Russian-Mongol Trade in 1919-1920s

V. S. Boyko (Barnaul State Pedagogical University), Barnaul Chinese
Community in early Soviet Period: Social-Psychological Portrait

V. A. Barmin (Barnaul State Pedagogical University), Soviets against People
Rebellion Movement in Gorny Altai 1920-22: The Patterns of Fighting

A. I. Gladkikh (Barnaul State Pedagogical University), Ethno-social
Composition of Rubtsovsk in 1920s-1930s: Asian Component

E. V. Diyatshenko (Altai State Technical University), Technical
Intelligentsia: The collaboration of scholars and practitioners in early 1970s

O. V. Boronin, A. Yu. Bykov (Altai State University), "The Rating" of
Central Asian Nationals in Estimation of Altai Province Rural Population

A. S. Kuzmitshev, L. N. Grazhdankina (Barnaul State Industrial-pedagogical
College), Foreign Student Education in Barnaul

N. S. Modorov (Gorno-Altai State University), From National Opposition to
Unity and Consent


Religion, Philosophy, and Culture

D. N. Lopatin (Omsk Technical University), Russian Altai-Kazakhstan Theater
Exchanges in Times of "Perestroika"

R. A. Abdumanapov (Tomsk Polytechnic University), About Kypchak Roots of
Kyrgyz Epos "Manas"

F. I. Kulikov (Gorno-Altaisk State University), About Some Regularities of
Localization and Iconography of Egyptian Old Kingdom Tomb Relief

M. M. Volobueva (Altai State University), Subjective Factor of Muslim
Religious Extremism

R. A. Kushnerik (Altai State University), The Problem of Interrelations of
Altai Shamanism and Tibet Ancient Beliefs

M. A. Kuleshova (Tomsk Polytechnic University), The Problem of Symbolic
Construction of Political Reality in Oriental Tradition

L. I. Sherstova (Tomsk Polytechnic University), Lamaism in Gorny Altai: the
Conditions and Results of Dissemination

M. M. Volobueva (Altai State University), The Training Recommendations to
the Scheme "The History of Religious Ideas in Japan"


All requests should be directed to Dr Vladimir Boyko, Director of the Center
for Regional Studies:
Barnaul 656031
Molodezhnaya Street 55
Russia
Tel: 7(3852)266687
fax: 7(3852)260836, e-mail: boyko(a)bspu.secna.ru

The proceedings of I-III Livshits Orientalist Workshops, as well The Third
International Conference "Russia, Siberia, and Central Asia: Interrelation
of Peoples and Cultures" are also available at our stock.

CALL FOR REVIEWERS- Int'l Journal for Comp. Sociology and Comp. Sociology

Posted by: M. Parvizi Amineh <amineh(a)pscw.uva.nl>
Posted: 27 Apr 2002


The International Journal for Comparative Sociology (IJCS) and Comparative
Sociology (CoSo) are soliciting authors for book reviews. The book reviews
will be published within six months after receipt of a completed review. If
you would like to receive for review any of the books listed below, please
reply by e.mail to Dr. Mehdi Parvizi Amineh book review editor of the CoSo
and IJCS, e.mail: amineh(a)pscw.uva.nl

Albritton, Robert et al (eds.), (2001), Phases of Capitalist Development,
(Basingstoke): Palgrave.

Allsen, Thomas T. (2001), Culture and Conquest in Mongol Eurasia,
(Cambridge): Cambridge University Press.

Andersson, David E. and Jessie P.H. Poon (eds.), (2001), Asia-Pacific
Transitions, (Basingstoke): Palgrave.

Andersson, David E. and Jessie P.H. Poon (eds.), (2001), Asia-Pacific
Transitions, (Basingstoke): Palgrave.

Ascher, Abraham (2001), P.A. Stolpyn-The Search for Stability in late
Imperial Russia, (Stanford): Stanford University Press.

Asouzu, Amazu A. (2001), International Commercial Arbitration and African
States, (Cambridge): Cambridge University Press.

Baker, Bruce (2000), escape From Domination in Africa-Political
Disengagement & Its Consequences, (Oxford, Trenton, NJ): James Currey,
Africa World Press.

Barry, Andrew (2001), Politicalo-Machines-Goverinigna technological Society,
(London & New York): The Athlone Press.

Baulch, Bon and John Hoddinott (2000), Economic Mobility and Poverty
Dynamics in Developing Countries, (London): Frank Cass.

Blomström, Magnus et al (eds.), (2001), Japan's New Economy-Continuity and
Change in the Twenty-First century, (Oxford): Oxford University Press.

Boje, Thomas P. and Arnlaug Leira (2000), Gender, welfare State, and the
Market-Towards a new division of labour, (London): Routledge.

Bramall, Chris (2000), Sources of Chinese Economic Growth 1978-1996,
(Oxford): Oxford University Press.

Elbadawi, Ibrahim and Benno Ndula (eds.), (2001), Economic Development in
SubSaharan Africa, (Basingstoke): Palgrave.

Fine, Ben et al (eds.), (2001), Development Policy in the Twenty-first
century-Beyond the post-Washington consensus, (London): Routledge.

Glaser, Daryl (2001), Politics and Society in South Africa, (London): Sage
Publications.

Hook, Glenn D. and Hasegawa Harukiyo (2001), The Political economy of
Japanese Globalisation, (London): Routledge.

Hutchison, Jane and Andrew Brown (2001), Organising Labour in Globalising
Asia, (London): Routledge.

Kalyuzhnova, Yelena et al (eds.), (2002), Energy in the Caspian Region,
(Basingstoke): Palgrave.

Kidd, Warren (2001), Culture and Identity, (Basingstoke): Palgrave.

Lawrence, Peter and Colin Thirtle (2001), Africa and Asia in Comparative
Economic Perspective, (Basingstoke): Palgrave.

Lin, Yi-min (2001), Between Politics and Markets-Firms, Competition, and
Institutional Change in post-Mao China, (Cambridge): Cambridge University
Press.

McCormick, Michael (2001), Origins of the European Economy-Communications
and Commerce ad300-900, (Cambridge): Cambridge University Press.

McMulle, Matthew et al (eds.), The Emerging Markets and Higher Education,
(London): Routledge.

Meilaender, Petzer C. (2002), Towards a Theory of Immigration,
(Basingstoke): Palgrave.

Niekerk, D. van et al (eds.), (2001), Governance, Politics, and Policy in
South Africa, (Oxford): Oxford University Press.

Pollini, Gabriele and Giuseppe Sciortino (2001), Parsons' The Structure of
Social Action and Contemporary Debates, (Milan): FrancoAngeli.

Salch, Tony (2001), Governance and Politics of China, (Basingstoke): Palgrave.

Sneath, David (2000), Changing Inner Mongolia-Pastoral Mongolian Society and
the Chinese State, (Oxford): oxford University Press.

Tibi, Bassam (2001), Islam Between Culture and Politics, (Basingstoke):
Palgrave.


Dr. M. Parvizi Amineh
Lecturer and Researcher in the post-Soviet Eurasia and Middle-East Politics,
Amsterdam School for Social Science Research (ASSR)
University of Amsterdam
Kloveniersburgwal 48
1012VX Amsterdam
The Netherlands
E-mail: amineh(a)pscw.uva.nl

JOURNAL/CFP- Fiscal Decentralization and Local Government Issues

Posted by: Gulnur Bolyspayeva <gulnur(a)kimep.kz>
Posted: 26 Apr 2002


CALL FOR PAPERS

The KIMEP Center for Research and Development is pleased to announce CALL
FOR PAPERS for the Annex of the third issue of the "Central Asian Journal of
Management, Economics and Social Research" devoted to the Fiscal
Decentralization and Local Government Issues.

The Central Asian Journal is an academic journal of the Kazakhstan Institute
of Management, Economics and Strategic Research (KIMEP) issued biannually.
Publication of this Annex is an integral part of the project on "Local
Government Expenditure Assignments in Kazakhstan" implemented by the KIMEP
Center for Research and Development and supported by LGI, Open Society
Institute, Hungary, and will be assumed by the researchers of the Center.
But, we also would like to publish some other articles from experts from
Kazakhstan, Central Asia, CIS and rest of the world.

The Editorial Board of the journal, consisting of professors of KIMEP, Yale
University and University of Pennsylvania, welcomes articles on fiscal
decentralization and local governance problems in Kazakhstan.  Papers of two
types are considered: as a main article of empirical nature and as an
article of general/theoretical nature.

Each manuscript submitted receives uttermost attention by the Editorial
Board and the reviewers. Acceptance decisions are taken on the basis of the
quality of articles' content only.

Submission rules:

Articles should be in English or in Russian. Articles written in Russian and
translated into English should be supplemented with an original version.

Articles should be approximately 15-20 double-spaced pages long and must
contain endnotes and references, which along with citations should follow
APA standard.

Cover page of the article should contain title, name(s) of the author(s),
affiliation and full correspondence information: telephone/fax numbers,
e-mail address.

Please, submit one copy of your article in paper and one copy in floppy disc

to:

A. Hoodashtian, Ph.D.
Director, the KIMEP Center for Research and Development
Off. # 224, 4, Abai Avenue
Almaty 480100
Kazakstan

It is also possible to submit the article via e-mail:

rscntr(a)kimep.kz / hoodash(a)kimep.kz

NB: There is no submission fee.

Deadline for submission: June 1, 2002


[Forwarded from: Announcements-l]

PUBLICATION- Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst, 24 April 2002 Issue on Web

Posted by: Svante Cornell <svante.cornell(a)pcr.uu.se>
Posted: 24 Apr 2002


The 24 April 2002 Issue of the Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst, a subscription
free Web journal with over 104,000 visitors to the site since November 1999
is now on-line at http://www.cacianalyst.org/

The Central Asia-Caucasus Institute of The Johns Hopkins University-The
Nitze School of Advanced International Studies is proud to announce the
publication of the 24 April 2002 issue of its biweekly Web-Journal, The
Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst.

The Institute also offers its readers the option of downloading The Analyst
in PDF format, enabling readers to view and print out the entire issue of
The Analyst. The html version will, of course, remain available.

The new issue of The CACI Analyst features four Analytical Articles, four
Field Reports, a summary of Senator Chuck Hagel's April 10 Talk at CACI, and
News Bites from the past fortnight.  The Analytical Articles feature:

COULD THE PANKISI GORGE DECIDE THE FATE OF THE CAUCASUS?
Pavel Baev
Georgia has been so anxiously awaiting the arrival of US troops as if they
are a miraculous solution to all the country's problems. Russia, after a
hysterical initial reaction, now tries to present this deployment as a part
of cooperation with the US in the global war against terrorism and as a
direct support from the US to its war against Chechnya. Washington,
apparently, assumes that this small-scale 'train-and-equip' operation could
positively contribute to the larger goal of stabilizing the Caucasus. The
risks, however, might turn out to be way beyond local disturbances.

KAZAKH OPPOSITION OVERPLAYS ITS HAND, FACES REPRESSION
Alima Bissenova
Political tensions in Kazakhstan have been escalating since last November
when several senior officials were sacked for joining a new political
movement, the Democratic Choice of Kazakhstan (DCK).  The DCK originally
founded as a reform party to represent the interests of the country's
entrepreneurial class, has become increasingly radicalized, a process
culminating in the arrest of one party co-founder and the placement of
another under the house arrest. In the midst of these political tensions the
government issued a response to allegations of President Nazarbayev's
embezzlement of government funds to his and his family accounts.

CIS REMAINS TOP PRIORITY IN RUSSIAN FOREIGN POLICY
Ariel Cohen
President Putin's recent State of the Federation address clearly indicates
that Russia puts increased emphasis on the CIS in its foreign policy.
Moreover, it indicates an understanding that security and economic
imperatives dictate that countries in the region pursue pluralistic and
"multi-polar" policies. Moscow will emphasize its military ties, security
cooperation, infrastructure projects, and cultural and educational
cooperation to boost its influence in the region. Yet the military may not
be satisfied with the official line, and the FSB is for the first time
officially working outside Russia's borders.

AKSY: A TURNING POINT, OR A BUMP ON A DOWNWARD SLOPE?
Emil Juraev
The last month's sad Aksy events in Kyrgyzstan came as a culmination of a
continued series of popular protests against government persecution of
political opposition and critics. Since the lethal incident, the police
shootings and the killing of protesters have tended to be overshadowed by a
preoccupation to come up with various explanations of the protest, such as
the miseries of life and the north-south divisions. The long protests of
political persecutions culminating in Aksy - the root cause of the events -
thus have appeared gradually to be fading into obscurity. Will this
grievance remain overlooked and muted even after Aksy, or will this be a
turning point?

THE FIELD REPORTS INCLUDE:

INFECTIOUS DISEASES IN KAZAKHSTAN GIVE CAUSE FOR CONCERN
The possible outbreak of infectious diseases associated with the nearing
summer is on everyone's lips in Kazakhstan. Medical specialists from various
countries at their recent conference in Almaty pointed out that eradicating
diseases in this country would require more than good luck. Shortage of
funds is only a part of the problem.

PARLIAMENTARY BY-ELECTIONS TOOK PLACE IN AZERBAIJAN
By-elections to the Azerbaijani parliament took place on April 12. Government
candidates won landslide victories in all three contested areas, leading to
accusations of election fraud. International observers noted grave violations
of the election process, while government representatives deny accusations of
fraud.

COORDINATOR OF US ASSISTANCE TO THE NIS VISITS KYRGYZSTAN
The coordinator of U.S. assistance to Kyrgyzstan recently visited the country,
and met with government officials as well as with representatives of media,
NGO, and alumni of U.S.-sponsored programs. Among other issues, the
representative discussed agricultural assistance to the Osh region.

GEOPOLITICAL APPROACHES: GAS POLICY OF UZBEKISTAN TOWARD KYRGYZSTAN
The relations between Tashkent and Bishkek are again frosty, and Uzbekistan has
threatened to halt deliveries of gas to Kyrgyzstan, stating a large unpaid
debt. Under the surface, however, the Uzbek policy is related to the
disagreements over border issues between the two countries.


The Analyst provides a rigorous, concise and nonpartisan forum where
specialists can assess issues and events in the Central Asia-Caucasus region
for a broad audience of business people, journalists, policy makers, government
officials, diplomats and academics.  The Analyst seeks regional specialists,
journalists, economists, and political scientists to join its pool of authors
who are then asked to contribute short, timely, analytical articles, ca.
900-1000 words in length. The institute pays a honorarium to the authors. The
Analyst also seeks local experts, corporate representatives and NGO
representatives from the region to write Field Reports for a modest honorarium.

The Analyst provides factual, objective and analytical articles valuing fresh
insights rather than the conventional wisdom.  We welcome readers and writers
from various perspectives and viewpoints.  We value your comments and
suggestions.

Those interested in joining The Analyst's pool of authors to contribute
articles, field reports or contacts of potential writers, please send your CV
to: svante.cornell(a)pcr.uu.se and suggest some topics on which you would like to
write. Please remember that The Analyst does not accept double submissions.


Svante E. Cornell, Acting Editor
Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst
Central Asia-Caucasus Institute
The Johns Hopkins University
Nitze School of Advanced International Studies
1619 Massachusetts Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20036
Tel. 1-202-663-7712
Fax. 1-202-663-7785
svante.cornell(a)pcr.uu.se

PUBLICATION- Rebirth of Uzbekistan: Politics, Economy and Society..., Resul Yalcin

Posted by: Resul Yalcin <r.m.yalcin(a)lse.ac.uk>
Posted: 24 Apr 2002


I'm happy to announce that my book 'The Rebirth of Uzbekistan: Politics,
Economy and Society in the post-Soviet Era' has been published (January
20002). Below is information about the book

Summary: Invaded by the Persians under Darius I, the Macedonians under
Alexander the Great, the Arabs in the eighth century and the Moguls in the
thirteenth, Uzbekistan evolved into a richly-textured country that came to
dominate Central Asia until its annexation by Russia in the nineteenth
century. Apart from giving an account of its history and culture, this book
examines the country's development since the break-up of the Soviet Union,
its social, political and economic orientation in the modern world and its
role as a bridge between East and West, North and South.

In the political field, author investigates the present system of government
and the democratic institutions that have been put in place. In the economic
field, he discusses Uzbekistan's path to economic reform and its
macroeconomic stabilization strategy, and explains the country's failure to
espouse the Western model of economic reform. As for the social setting the
author provides a detailed account of the ethnic minorities living alongside
Uzbekistan's Muslim majority, and analyzes inter-ethnic relations. The
diversity of information on this increasingly important and little-known
country makes this an authoritative work for those with an interest in the
modernization taking place not only in Uzbekistan, but in Central Asia as a
whole.

CONTENTS

List of Tables
Acknowledgements
Foreword
Introduction

1. History and the People:

Introduction, Industry, Language, Religion and culture, Environment, Women
in Uzbek society, The ancient history of Uzbekistan, The modern history of
Uzbekistan, The demise of the Soviet Union, The emergence of the Independent
Republic of Uzbekistan, Post-Soviet Uzbekistan, The Karakalpak Autonomous
Republic, The ethnic origin of the Uzbeks.

2. Social Transformation: Past, Present and Future:

Introduction, The nomads, The transformation under Russian rule, The
transformation of Uzbekistan under the Soviet Union, The post-Soviet
transformation, The Uzbek ideology of national independence: Sociocultural
function, Political function., Nation building in Uzbekistan, Islam in
Uzbekistan, Ethnic minorities and inter-ethnic relations in Uzbekistan,
ethnic minorities: Russians, Tajiks, Kazaks, Tatars, Karakalpaks, Koreans,
Meskhetian Turks, Jews, Germans, Kyrgyz, Uighurs, Inter-ethnic relations.

3. The Transition to Democracy in Uzbekistan:

Introduction, The political, economic and cultural distinctiveness of
Uzbekistan's historical development, Basic conditions of the Uzbek model of
reform, Constitution, The presidency of the Republic, The Parliament-Oliy
Majlis, Function and features of local authority bodies in Uzbekistan, Party
system and political parties in Uzbekistan, conclusion.

4. The Economic Transformation:

Introduction, Initial macroeconomic performance after the break-up of the
Soviet Union, From rouble zone to national currency, Towards a national
economic model of reform, The economic reform process, Macroeconomic
progress since independence, Sectoral development: Agriculture, Industry,
Transport and communication, construction, trade and services., Poverty and
social protection, conclusion.

5. Foreign Policy and External Relations:

Introduction, Uzbek foreign policy, Towards regional integration, Uzbekistan
and the Commonwealth of Independent States, Uzbekistan and Russia,
Uzbekistan and Turkey, Uzbekistan and Asia, Uzbekistan and the Middle East,
Uzbekistan and Iran, Uzbekistan and Israel, Uzbekistan and the European
Union: The Partnership and Cooperation Agreement, The TACIS Programme for
Uzbekistan., Uzbekistan and Germany, Uzbekistan and France, Uzbekistan and
the United Kingdom, An overview of Uzbek-EU relations, Uzbekistan and the
US, Cooperation with international organisations, Conclusion.

6. Conclusion

Appendices
Interviews
Bibliography
Index

£35.00 cloth/ ISNB 0- 86372-281-4


All enquiries to be made to Ithaca Press.  Contact person:

Emma G Hawker
Editorial Manager
Garnet Publishing
(incorporating Ithaca Press and South Street Press)
8 Southern Court
South Street
READING RG1 4QS
UNITED KINGDOM
e-mail:emmahawker(a)garnet-ithaca.demon.co.uk
Tel:+44 (0)118 959 7847
Fax: +44 (0) 118 959 7356
Web: www.garnet-ithaca.co.uk

JOURNAL/CFP- Papeles del Este: New Labor Markets in (Post)Socialist States

Posted by: Ruth Ferrero <rf2023(a)columbia.edu>
Posted: 21 Apr 2002


Call for Papers

Papeles del Este is a biannual electronic journal that analyzes topics
related to the transformations that took place in systems demarcated by
their Soviet genre.  Thus, Papeles del Este aspires to go beyond our
mentioned scope of analysis by including the similar experiences of reform
seen in countries such as China, Cuba and Vietnam.

Our objective is to develop a forum of critical debate concerning the
changes that have taken place in the post-communist countries and to offer
an open editorial space where individuals may publish investigations that
rigorously study the transformation of the post-communist systems and it's
repercussions on the new world order.

Our intentions are to elaborate the essential questions that help in
understanding, analyzing and explaining the challenges dealt with by the
post-communist countries from an interdisciplinary view.  Each issue will
contain a monograph followed by a forum of debate; this latter section will
be composed of the ideas postulated in the monograph and of other works on
the problematic of transition, not necessarily related with the monograph.
We would be pleased if you decide to collaborate with us by sending us your
articles.

The next issue of Papeles del Este. Transiciones poscomunistas (which will
be edited in June of 2002) will examine the economic, social and
institutional aspects of the new labor markets.

Furthermore, you can collaborate by sending:
  * Addresses of websites
  * Book and magazine reviews
  * Dates of meeting and seminars
  * Commentaries, critiques, proposals of topics for subsequent issues

For more information concerning norms of publication consult our web-site at
www.ucm.es/BCUM/cee/papeles o write us at papeles(a)ccee.ucm.es.
Phone: 91-3942404
Fax: 91-3942499
Postal Address:
Papeles del Este, Transiciones Poscomunistas.
Departamento de Economía Aplicada I. Pabellón de 2º Curso.
Universidad Complutense de Madrid. Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y
Empresariales.
Campus de Somosaguas. Pozuelo de Alarcón. 28223 Madrid. España.

PUBLICATION- ISAR's Journal "Give & Take"

Posted by: Tamara Kowalski <tamara(a)isar.org>
Posted: 19 Apr 2002


"Independent Public Health Initiatives"
ISAR Announces the Spring 2002 Issue of Give & Take: A Journal on Civil
Society in Eurasia

ISAR: INITIATIVE FOR SOCIAL ACTION AND RENEWAL IN EURASIA, a US-based NGO,
is pleased to announce the Spring 2002 issue of its quarterly publication,
Give & Take: A Journal on Civil Society in Eurasia.

This issue of Give & Take salutes the independent initiatives of NGOs in the
former Soviet Union working to provide health services to the least-served
segments of the population, from alcohol and drug addicts to pregnant
mothers, from young people with cerebral palsy to disabled women and children.

In this issue we hear about Central Asian journalists brave enough to
publicize the repressive region's public health problems; Goldman prize
winner Oral Ataniyazova's efforts to improve reproductive health in
Karakalpakstan (Uzbekistan); and an NGO in Atyrau, Kazakhstan that has won
government support to provide preventive health care. Articles also address
groups working with addiction issues and HIV/AIDS, and a joint university
project in Kansas that has brought indigenous peoples in the Midwest
together with their counterparts in Siberia to deal with contaminated water
sources, a prime cause of illness among native communities in both countries.

These NGO interventions demonstrate the staunch, enterprising way private
citizens seek solutions to society's toughest problems when traditional
structures break down. They also provide compelling examples of how, in the
face of apparently intractable problems, FSU/US partner organizations
encourage and empower each other by joining forces.


Give & Take draws on ISAR's grassroots contacts and 17 years of experience
encouraging citizen initiatives in the countries of the former Soviet Union.
The journal blends stories about local NGO activity with analysis of the
trends affecting civil society development.

TO RECEIVE GIVE & TAKE:

For a copy of the latest issue, or to order back-issues, please contact
Tamara Kowalski (tamara(a)isar.org) or send $5.00 (checks drawn on a US bank
only) to:

ISAR, 1601 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite #301, Washington, DC 20009

GIVE & TAKE ON THE WEB:

Give & Take is also available on-line and in .pdf format at
<http://www.isar.org>. The website includes information on ISAR programs, as
well as archived articles from Give & Take, ISAR in Focus (ISAR's newsletter
on field office activities), and from our previous journal, Surviving Together.

BECOME A MEMBER!

Your tax-deductible membership of $35 ($50 for organizations/institutions)
supports our programmatic work and public outreach efforts.  Membership
includes a one-year subscription to Give & Take: A Journal on Civil Society
in Eurasia and ISAR's newsletter, ISAR in Focus, as well as invitations to
our forums and brown-bag lunches.

Please send your name, mailing address and e-mail, along with your check
made payable to ISAR to Membership Program, at the address above.

PUBLICATION- Central Asian Survey, Vol. 21, No. 1

Posted by: Sharron Lawrence <sharronl(a)tandf.co.uk>
Posted: 19 Apr 2002


Volume 21 Number 1/March 01, 2002 of Central Asian Survey is now available
on the Taylor and Francis web site at http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com.

The following URL will take you directly to the issue:
http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/link.asp?id-H6H43PQV0H

This issue contains:

Civilizing the Middle Kingdom's wild west
Abigail Sines

Why Mongolia? The political culture of an emerging democracy
Paula L.W. Sabloff

The mythology of munificent Caspian bonanza and its concomitant pipeline
    geopolitics
Alec Rasizade

Spheres of communal participation: placing the state within local modes of
    interaction in rural Uzbekistan
Johan Rasanayagam

Between the state and cultural zones: nation building in Turkmenistan
Ahmet T. Kuru

Discipline, knowledge and imperial power in Central Asia: 19th century notes
    for a genealogy of social forms
Brian Silverstein

The liberal and socialist influences on Azerbaijani nationalism at the
   beginning of the 20th century
Cengiz Çagla


To subscribe to this journal, please email: JaneD(a)tandf.co.uk

PUBLICATION- The Evolution of the Contemporary Islamism (in French)

Posted by: P. Dombrowsky <ferghana(a)netcourrier.com>
Posted: 17 Apr 2002


The French Observatoire d'Analyses des Relations Internationales
Contemporaines (Observatory for Analysis on Contemporary International
Relations) announces the first issue of a new collection: Les Cahiers
d'Etudes de l'OARIC.

This first issue is focused on the evolution of the contemporary Islamism,
just after the 11th September events.  It is a stage in the geopolitical
reflection dedicated to a region (from the Mediterranean Sea to the Chinese
suburbs) which has become essential for the worldwide stability, and which
is furrowed by dangerous trends.  This book helps a better understanding of
this problematic, in order to anticipate its consequences.  It is a very
useful guide to everybody who wants to understand why the 11th September
events occurred, why the Afghan war became necessary, and why the Islamic
groups have become so important in the area situated between the Middle East
and Central Asia.

Des sables de la péninsule Arabique aux steppes d'Asie centrale, l'évolution
de l'islamisme contemporain
Sandrine Lesperat & Hélène Pradon
Paris - April 2002
Price: 8 €

You may ask some more information and buy issues of the book at the
following contact: ceram(a)oaric.com

ON-LINE PUBLICATION- CERAM-Infos: The Situation in Afghanistan

Posted by: P. Dombrowsky <ferghana(a)netcourrier.com>
Posted: 17 Apr 2002


Please let me inform you that a new issue of CERAM-Infos is now available
online. Main subject: the situation in Afghanistan.

This information letter in French focuses on political, economic, social and
international matters concerning Middle Asia, from Caspian to Mongolia, and
from the Arctic Ocean to Oman Gulf.

You may read the past issues online at the following address:
http://www.oaric.com/ceraminfos.htm

If you want to access to the current issue, you'll have to subscribe (free
of charge) to the mailing list of the CERAM (Center for Studies and Research
on Middle Asia), at the same address.

Hope to welcome you soon among the readers of CERAM-Infos.

P. Dombrowsky

PUBLICATION- Petroglyphs in Mongolia, E. Jacobson et al.

Posted by: Esther Jacobson <ejacobs(a)OREGON.UOREGON.EDU>
Posted: 16 Apr 2002


Announcement: publication of the largest petroglyphic site in Mongolia,
Tsagaan Salaa/Baga Oigor, in the Altay Mountains of Bayan Olgiy aimag.  Text
in English and Russian.

MEMOIRES DE LA MISSION ARCHEOLOGIQUE FRANCAISE EN ASIE CENTRALE No. 6.  E.
Jacobson, V. Kubarev, D. Tseevendorj, MONGOLIE DU NORD-OUEST, TSAGAAN
SALAA/BAGA OIGOR.  2 vol. (21.5 x 30) reliés : Texte et figures 482 p., 1323
pictogrammes, Planches 256 p., 12 cartes, 3 ill., 427 photo. dont 28 en
couleurs, 2001, (3300 g).  95 euros.  (approx. $84 as of 4/11/02)

It can be ordered by going to the publisher's website:
http://www.deboccard.com
    1) Welcome
    2) New Publications
    3) COMMISSION DES FOUILLES ET MISSIONS ARCHEOLOGIQUES

PUBLICATION- Two Books: A. Rashid, Jihad; B. Rubin, Fragmentation of Afghanistan

Posted by: Timothy Shea <tjs(a)yalepress3.unipress.yale.edu>
Posted: 10 Apr 2002


Jihad
The Rise of Militant Islam in Central Asia
By Ahmed Rashid
Published February 2002
By Yale University Press
$24.00 Hardcover

http://yalebooks.com/jihad

Before September 11, few Americans thought much about Uzbekistan,
Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan. Now that these troubled
countries are in the news, we as a nation have a lot to learn. Ahmed Rashid,
author of the #1 New York Times bestseller Taliban, has written a
frightening, incredibly thorough book that makes clear all that is at stake
in this unstable region. Jihad: The Rise of Militant Islam in Central Asia,
to be published February 25, 2002, by Yale University Press, is truly a book
every American should read.

Rashid begins by explaining how the important concept of Jihad is both
misunderstood in the West and misused by militant Islamic groups in Central
Asia. He then chronicles the brutal destruction under Soviet rule of Central
Asia's rich, tolerant version of Islam--a loss that left Central Asians
vulnerable to imported religious fundamentalism. And drawing on his
legendary skills as an investigative journalist and his deep immersion in
the ethnic complexities of the region, he describes the rise and workings of
three new Islamic fundamentalist groups, two of them highly secretive, and
outlines the risks they pose for Central Asia and the world.

As he examines in detail the goals and daily operations of the Islamic
Renaissance Party, the Hizb ut-Tahrir al-Islami, and the most violent group,
the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan, Rashid makes clear that all jihadi
groups are not alike. Yet the shaky governments of the Central Asian
republics often paint Muslims with one brush, treating terrorist insurgents
and the ordinary faithful with similar repressive measures and fueling a
growing rage throughout the region. The U.S. and other nations, once
optimistic that democracy would take root in the fledgling nations after the
fall of the Soviet Union, have looked away from the increasing repression
and desperate social ills that plague Central Asia's citizens, while
jockeying for a share in Central Asia's untapped mineral wealth.  The
resulting volatile atmosphere has been fertile ground for charismatic
leaders such as Mullah Muhammad Omar and Osama Bin Laden. Rashid gives us a
fascinating portrait of another man--less well-known in the West but
legendary in his region--I.M.U. leader Juma Namangani.  Namangani's fate is
uncertain--there have been unconfirmed reports of his death in recent weeks.
But the climate that allowed his climb to power and that has nourished his
radical, violent organization remains. The story Rashid tells of Namangani's
ascent is the story of disintegrating hopes for stability in Central Asia.


About the Author

Ahmed Rashid is author of the #1 New York Times bestseller Taliban: Militant
Islam, Oil and Fundamentalism in Central Asia. He is currently a
correspondent for The Wall Street Journal, The Far Eastern Economic Review
and The Daily Telegraph. He also writes for The Nation, Pakistan's largest
daily newspaper. Mr. Rashid is a frequent guest on National Public Radio and
on U.S. television, as well as on the BBC World Service and BBC TV. One of
the most sought-after experts on Afghanistan, Mr. Rashid has recently given
talks and briefings at the White House, the National Security Council, the
State Department, the World Affairs Council, the Brookings Institution and
the United Nations.

Rashid has covered Afghanistan, Central Asia, and Pakistan for more than 20
years, and his writings on the region have appeared in Foreign Affairs, The
Washington Post, The New York Times, The L.A. Times, The Nation, and many
other publications. An excerpt from Jihad: The Rise of Militant Islam in
Central Asia is scheduled to appear in The New Yorker.

Rashid has witnessed some of the most important moments in recent Afghan
history. He watched as tanks blasted their way into the Kabul palace of
President Mohammed Daud in the 1978 coup that was to begin Afghanistan's
disintegration. He saw the first Soviet tanks roll in a year later, sparking
the devastating war that took a million Afghan lives. He covered the 1988
Geneva talks that led to the Soviet army's withdrawal from Afghanistan. He
was in Kabul when the city fell to the Mujaheddin in 1992, and he witnessed
the meteoric rise of the Taliban that followed. Since the events of
September 11, he has been a valuable source of insight into the unfolding
events in Afghanistan.

Born in Pakistan and educated at Cambridge University, Mr. Rashid lives in
Lahore with his wife and two children.


The Fragmentation of Afghanistan
Second Edition, Revised
By Barnett R. Rubin
Published simultaneously in cloth and paper
$35.00 hardcover
$18.95 paper

http://www.yale.edu/yup/books/095201.htm

Barnett Rubin is one of the world's leading experts on Afghanistan. His
understanding of the history of that country is perhaps unmatched. Rubin's
deep knowledge of Afghanistan's past will prove incredibly valuable as
America struggles to understand the current turmoil and participates in a
plan for a peaceful future.

Yale University Press is proud to announce the publication of a revised
edition of Rubin's classic work The Fragmentation of Afghanistan. This
monumental book examines Afghan society in conflict from the 1978 Communist
coup through the fall of the last Soviet-installed president in 1992. Rubin
has added substantial material to reflect Afghanistan's incredible journey
since then, with expert discussion of the Taliban and Osama bin Laden.

For readers who want a coherent, authoritative historical explanation for
the social and political disintegration of Afghanistan, Rubin's The
Fragmentation of Afghanistan is absolutely essential. In the early weeks of
the war, many journalists and government leaders turned to Rubin in their
hunger for information. Now general readers can turn to Rubin for the smart
analysis and historical context they need. I urge you to let your readers
know that this new edition is available.

About the Author

Barnett R. Rubin is Director of Studies and Senior Fellow at the Center for
International Cooperation at New York University. From 1994 to 2000 he was
Director of the Center for Preventive Action and Director of Peace and
Conflict Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. He is one
of the world's foremost experts on Afghanistan and the surrounding region
and a leading thinker on conflict prevention and peace building.

Dr. Rubin is currently Deputy Chair and Senior Advisor of the Conflict
Prevention and Peace Forum and a member of the Steering Committee of Human
Rights Watch/Europe and Central Eurasia. He is a board member of the Open
Society Institute's Project on Central Asia, the Conseil Scientifique of the
Fondation Médecins sans Frontières, and the International League for Human
Rights. From 1996 to 1998 he served on the Secretary of State's Advisory
Committee on Religious Freedom Abroad.

Dr. Rubin is author, coauthor, or editor of many books, among them The
Search for Peace in Afghanistan: From Buffer State to Failed State, Toward
Comprehensive Peace in Southeast Europe: Conflict Prevention in the South
Balkans and Calming the Ferghana Valley: Development and Dialogue in the
Heart of Central Asia.


Tim Shea
Electronic Promotions
Yale University Press
P.O. Box 209040
New Haven, CT 06520-9040

tim.shea(a)yale.edu
203/436-1321phone
203/432-5455 fax

Be sure to visit our Website: http://yalebooks.com

New release email notification service:
http://yalebooks.com/email

PUBLICATION- Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst, 10 April 2002 Issue on Web

Posted by: Svante Cornell <svante.cornell(a)pcr.uu.se>
Posted: 10 Apr 2002


The 10 April 2002 Issue of the Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst, a subscription
free Web journal with over 104,000 visitors to the site since November 1999 is
now on-line at http://www.cacianalyst.org/

The Central Asia-Caucasus Institute of The Johns Hopkins University-The Nitze
School of Advanced International Studies is proud to announce the publication
of the 10 April 2002 issue of its biweekly Web-Journal, The Central Asia-
Caucasus Analyst.

The Institute also offers its readers the option of downloading The Analyst in
PDF format, enabling readers to view and print out the entire issue of The
Analyst. The html version will, of course, remain available.

The new issue of The CACI Analyst features four Analytical Articles, four 
Field
Reports, and News Bites from the past fortnight.  The Analytical Articles
feature:

HIV/AIDS EPIDEMIC: TIME IS RUNNING OUT FOR CENTRAL ASIA
Ali Buzurukov
22 years since its beginning, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has reached the remote
states of Central Asia, with explosive rates of growth at that. The already
high prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases, alarming drug addiction
rates, widespread unemployment, and the mainly young population and low
awareness all make the Central Asian states particularly vulnerable to a large
scale epidemic. The Central Asian states' largely unreformed and under-funded
health systems are too weak and too slow to react to the growing epidemic. The
governments and international community must commit themselves to long-term
multicultural regional strategy in order to reverse the trend.

U.S. MILITARY IN AZERBAIJAN, TO COUNTER IRANIAN THREAT
Stephen Blank
Recently much attention has focused on the rising U.S. military presence in
Central Asia and Georgia. This presence has been seen as signifying not just
America's determination to smash terrorism that originated in and around
Afghanistan, but also an intention to establish a lasting multi-dimensional
U.S. presence in Central Asia and the Caucasus.  However, less well publicized
is the fact that the U.S. government and military are now directly assisting
Azerbaijan to enhance its naval capacity to secure its maritime borders.  This
move is not only linked to the two goals stated above, but also signifies the
first time that Washington has directly confronted Iran with the possibility of
military support for Azerbaijan against Tehran's continuing threats.  This move
also highlights the deterioration of maritime security within the Caspian Sea
and its accompanying militarization.

A DEMOGRAPHIC UPHEAVAL IN KYRGYZSTAN?
Rafis Abazov
President Askar Akayev of Kyrgyzstan announced that the population of his
republic would pass the 5 million mark in early 2002, up from 4.5 million in
1990. While not the highest growth rate compared to many developing countries,
it creates a big problem for the Kyrgyzstani government. The population has
been growing against a backdrop of a failing economy, decreasing job
opportunities and deteriorating environment. If the economic, social and
educational needs of the rapidly growing population are not effectively
addressed soon, the government may face political upheaval.

THE AFGHAN AND CENTRAL ASIAN FACTOR IN INDIAN-PAKISTANI RIVALRY
Hooman Peimani
The recent statements of Hamid Karzai and his talks with Turkmen authorities
regarding the construction of a gas pipeline connecting Turkmenistan to
Pakistan via Afghanistan have created security concerns in West Asia. The
reemerging interests in the abandoned pipeline plan has worried rival regional
countries as its realization will boast the regional and international status
of Pakistan, beyond its economic benefits for Pakistanis. If constructed, this
pipeline would intensify the ongoing regional rivalry and hostility between
long-time rivals India and Pakistan, while having significant implications for
political and security developments in West Asia.

THE FIELD REPORTS INCLUDE:

AZERBAIJAN-AMERICAN MILITARY CONSULTATIONS TAKE PLACE IN BAKU
Though military ties between Washington and Baku began in 1997, Section 907 of
the Freedom Support Act stopped the implementation of closer ties. Its waiver
earlier this year enabled a significant intensification of military relations,
and a first consultation between the U.S. Department of Defense and the
Azerbaijani military took place in Baku in late March.

KYRGYZ OPPOSITION RESPONDS TO THE RECENT BLOODY EVENTS.
Opposition forces in Kyrgyzstan are coalescing to investigate the bloody 
events
of mid-March, and have resolved to investigate the events independently and to
demand the resignation of the President. Mistrust in official 
investigations is
fueling these efforts, that are gradually being implemented.


OPPOSITION LEADERS ARRESTED IN KAZAKHSTAN
The patience of the Kazakh government in dealing with the main opposition
movement, the Democratic Choice of Kazakhstan, is running out. The clear
indication of a new crusade against the "trouble-makers" appears to be the
recent arrest of the two prominent opposition leaders accused of financial
impropriety. The rulers of the country may be sliding back into an abyss of an
authoritarian rule.

IFES ACTIVITIES IN KYRGYZSTAN
For the past six years, IFES has been active in Kyrgyzstan in the election
process as well as civil society and civic education. IFES conducted voter
education programming, election observer training, media monitoring, and
pollworker training which involved the production of training manuals for all
polling station officials and conducting nationwide training sessions.

The Analyst provides a rigorous, concise and nonpartisan forum where
specialists can assess issues and events in the Central Asia-Caucasus region
for a broad audience of business people, journalists, policy makers, 
government
officials, diplomats and academics.  The Analyst seeks regional specialists,
journalists, economists, and political scientists to join its pool of authors
who are then asked to contribute short, timely, analytical articles, ca. 900-
1000 words in length. The institute pays a honorarium to the authors. The
Analyst also seeks local experts, corporate representatives and NGO
representatives from the region to write Field Reports for a modest 
honorarium.

The Analyst provides factual, objective and analytical articles valuing fresh
insights rather than the conventional wisdom.  We welcome readers and writers
from various perspectives and viewpoints.  We value your comments and
suggestions.

Those interested in joining The Analyst's pool of authors to contribute
articles, field reports or contacts of potential writers, please send your CV
to: svante.cornell(a)pcr.uu.se and suggest some topics on which you would 
like to
write. Please remember that The Analyst does not accept double submissions.


Svante E. Cornell, Acting Editor
Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst
Central Asia-Caucasus Institute
The Johns Hopkins University
Nitze School of Advanced International Studies
1619 Massachusetts Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20036
Tel. 1-202-663-7712
Fax. 1-202-663-7785
svante.cornell(a)pcr.uu.se

PUBLICATION- Mongols at China's Edge, Uradyn E. Bulag

Posted by: Uradyn Bulag <ubulag(a)hunter.cuny.edu>
Posted: 10 Apr 2002


The following book is now available from the publisher immediately. It
should reach E-bookstores within a week or so.  The publisher's website has
the first chapter for sample reading.

The Mongols at China's Edge: History and the Politics of National Unity
By Uradyn E. Bulag

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
$34.95 Paper  0-7425-1144-8 April 28, 2002 288pp
$75.00 Cloth  0-7425-1143-X April 28, 2002 288pp
http://www.rowmanlittlefield.com

This important study explores the multifaceted Mongol experience in China,
past and present. Combining insights from anthropology, history, and
postcolonial criticism, Uradyn Bulag avoids romanticizing Mongols either as
pacified primitive Other or as gallant resistance fighters. Rather, he
portrays them as a people whose communist background and standing in China's
northern borderlands has informed their political efforts to harness or
confront Chinese nationalistic and political hegemony. Breaking new ground
in the study of Chinese and Mongol history and ethnicity, the author offers
a fresh interpretation of China viewed from the perspective of its
peripheries, and of minority nationalities in relation to the study of
Chinese representation and minority self-representation.

The author interrogates received wisdom about Chinese and minority
nationalism by unraveling the Chinese discourse and practice of "national
unity." He shows how the discourse was constructed over time through
political rituals and sexuality in relation to Mongols and other non-Chinese
peoples that hark back to Chinese-Xiongnu confrontations two millennia ago
and Manchu conquest in the 17th and 18th centuries. Titular rulers of an
autonomous region in which they constitute a minority, Mongols face enormous
barriers in building and maintaining a socialist Mongolian nationality and a
Mongolian language and culture. Acknowledging these difficulties, Bulag
discusses a range of sensitive issues including the imbrication of nation,
class, and ethnicity in the context of Mongol-Chinese relations, tensions
inherent in writing a postrevolutionary history for a socialist nationality,
and the moral dilemma of building a socialist model with Mongol
characteristics. Charting the interface between a state-centered
multinational Chinese polity and a primordial nationalist multiculturalism
that aims to manage minority nationalities as "cultures," he explores Mongol
ethnopolitical strategies to preserve their heritage.

http://www.rowmanlittlefield.com/Chapters/Index.shtml?SKU=074251143X&Site=ro
wmanlittlefield&Title=The%20Mongols%20at%20China%27s%20Edge

Contents:

a. By Way of Introduction: Minzu Tuanjie and Its Discontents
b. Producing and Reproducing National Unity
c. Ritualizing National Unity: Modernity at the Edge of China
d. Naturalizing National Unity: Political Romance and the Chinese Nation
e. Tensions of Empire
f. From Inequality to Difference: Colonial Contradictions of Class and
    Ethnicity in "Socialist" China
g. Rewriting "Inner Mongolian" History after the Revolution: Ethnicity,
    Nation, and the Struggle for Recognition
h. Models and Morality
i. Models and Morality: The Parable of the "Little Heroic Sisters of the
    Grassland"
j. The Cult of Ulanhu: History, Memory, and the Making of an Ethnic Hero

About the Author:

Uradyn E. Bulag is associate professor of anthropology at Hunter College and
the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He is the author of
Nationalism and Hybridity in Mongolia.

PUBLICATION- Health Care in Central Asia, Martin McKee, et al.

Posted by: UBC Press <info(a)ubcpress.ubc.ca>
Posted: 6 Apr 2002


Health Care in Central Asia

Martin McKee, Judith Healy and Jane Falkingham, eds.
$53.95 Paperback
Release Date: 2/25/02
ISBN: 0335209262
240 Pages

Central Asia remains one of the least known parts of the former Soviet
Union.  The five central Asian republics gained their unexpected
independence in 1991.  They have faced enormous challenges over the last
decade in reforming their health care systems, including adverse
macro-economic conditions and political instability.  To varying extents,
each country is diverging from a hierarchical and unsustainable Soviet model
health care system.  Common strategies have involved devolving the ownership
of health services, seeking sources of revenue additional to shrinking state
taxes, "down-sizing" their excessive hospital systems, introducing general
practitioners into primary care services, and enhancing the training of
health professionals.  This book draws on a decade of experience of what has
worked and what has not.  It is an invaluable source for those working in
the region and for others interested in the experiences of countries in
political and economic transition.

Contents:

Part 1: Context

Health care systems in the central Asian republics:
An introduction
    Martin McKee, Judith Healy and Jane Falkingham
History and politics in central Asia: change and continuity
    Shirin Akiner
Macroeconomic pressures
    Richard Pomfret
Poverty, affordability and access to health care
    Jane Falkingham
Patterns of health
    Martin McKee and Laurent Chenet
The Soviet legacy: the past as prologue
    Mark G. Field

Part II: Health systems and services

The reform process
    B. Serdar Savas, Gülin Gedik and Marian Craig
Health Systems Funding
    Joseph Kutzin and Cheryl Cashin
Allocating resources and paying providers
    Tim Ensor and Jack Langenbrunner
The health care workforce
    Judith Healy
Modernizing primary health care
    Gülin Gedik, Zafer Oztek and Antony Lewis
Rationalizing Hospital Services
    Johannes Vang and Steve Hajioff
Restructuring public health services
    In MacArthur and Elena Shevkun
Health care systems in transition
    Judith Healy, Jane Falkingham and Martin McKee

Part III: The Countries

Profiles of country health care systems:
Kazakhstan
    Maksur Kulzhanov and Judith Healy
Kyrgyzstan
    Acelle Sargaldakova, Judith Healy, Joseph Kutzin and Gülin Gedik
Tajikistan
    Rahmin Rahminov, Gülin Gedik and Judith Healy
Turkmenistan
    Chary Mamedkuliev, Elena Shevkiun and Steve Hajioff
Uzbekistan
    Farkhar A Ilkhamov, Elke Jakobowski and Steve Hajioff

How to Order:

To order your copy of Health Care in Central Asia, contact Raincoast
Fulfillment Services at:
Raincoast Books
9050 Shaughnessy Street
Vancouver, B.C. V6P 6E5
Canada

E-mail: custserv(a)raincoast.com
Phone: (604) 323-7106
or (in North America) 1-800-663-5714
Ordering information for customers outside Canada:
http://www.ubcpress.ubc.ca/books/ordering.html

UBC Press
2029 West Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, V6T 1Z2
tel.: 604.822.5959
fax:  604.822.6083
e-mail: info(a)ubcpress.ubc.ca

PUBLICATION- Central Asia and the Caucasus, 2002 No. 2

Posted by: Murad Esenov <murad(a)communique.se>
Posted: 1 Apr 2002


Dear Colleagues,

I bring to your attention the contents of the second issue (Volume 14, no.
2) of the journal "Central Asia and the Caucasus" (in English and Russian).
It will be published in late April.  To inquire about more details, as well
as to subscribe, please contact:

Murad Esenov
Central Asia and the Caucasus IAC
Sweden
tel/fax: (46) 920 620 16
e-mails:
murad(a)communique.se
murad(a)bredband.net
http://www.ca-c.org


CENTRAL ASIA AND THE CAUCASUS
Journal of Social and Political Studies
No. 2 (14), 2002

IN THIS ISSUE:

REGIONAL POLITICS

Talgat Ismagambetov. STRUCTURING CENTRAL ASIA'S NEW GEOPOLITICAL SPACE:
    REGIONAL CHARACTERISTICS AND PROSPECTS

Roger N. McDermott. RUSSIA'S SECURITY AGENDA IN CENTRAL ASIA

Dina Malysheva. MANY-SIDED RIVALRY ON THE CASPIAN SEA

David Gullette. TRIBALISM IN KYRGYZSTAN EXAMINED

Sergei Kamenev. THE CURRENT SOCIOPOLITICAL SITUATION IN TURKMENISTAN

Lia Melikishvili. GEORGIA: POTENTIAL SEATS OF ETHNIC CONFLICTS

Alexander Krylov. THE SPECIAL FEATURES OF FORMING A MULTIPARTY SYSTEM IN
    ABKHAZIA

RELIGION IN SOCIETY

Sergei Abashin. ISLAMIC FUNDAMENTALISM IN CENTRAL ASIA: WHY IT APPEARED AND
    WHAT TO EXPECT

Sapar Ali Beibit, Muhamed-Kanafia Barbasov. KAZAKHSTAN: RELIGIONS AND
    RELATIONS BETWEEN CONFESSIONS

SPECIAL FEATURE

INTER-STATE AND INTERREGIONAL INTEGRATION IN CENTRAL ASIA AND THE CAUCASUS

Farkhod Tolipov. REGIONAL INTEGRATION IN CENTRAL ASIA: THEORY AND PRACTICE

Dmitri Trofimov. SHANGHAI PROCESS: FROM THE "FIVE" TO THE COOPERATION
    ORGANIZATION. SUMMING UP THE 1990S AND LOOKING AHEAD

Laura Bagdasarian. COOPERATION IN SOUTHERN CAUCASUS: THEORY AND PRACTICE

Yuri Kochubei. GUUAM AND EQUAL REGIONAL COOPERATION

Oleg Rybkin, Sergei Kazanskiy. TRANSNATIONALS AND NATURAL MONOPOLIES IN CIS
    INTEGRATION PROCESSES

CULTURE AND SOCIETY

Vladimir Alpatov. ALPHABET REFORM: CYRILLIC OR LATIN?

Azat Egiazarian. ARMENIA: CULTURE IN THE YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE

REGIONAL ECONOMIES

Vahagn Khachatrian. BASIC TRENDS IN ARMENIA'S ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN 1991-2001

Rauf Jabiev. AZERBAIJAN: PRIVATIZATION OF STATE PROPERTY AND ITS EFFECTS

Vladimir Papava. ON THE SPECIAL FEATURES OF GEORGIA'S INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC
    FUNCTION

Ali Zhuraev. SOCIAL STRATIFICATION AND FORMATION OF MIDDLE CLASS IN UZBEKISTAN

Kai Wegerich. NATURAL DROUGHT OR HUMAN MADE WATER SCARCITY IN UZBEKISTAN?

DEMOGRAPHY

Dmitri Nikitin, Alexander Khalmukhamedov. MIGRATION AS A DESTABILIZATION
    FACTOR IN THE NORTHERN CAUCASUS

Azer Allakhveranov. THE MIGRATION SITUATION IN AZERBAIJAN

FOR YOUR INFORMATION

The Special Feature section in the next issue will discuss:
Central Asia and the Caucasus

  - The Place of Religion in the Sociopolitical Context

  - Antiterrorist Campaign of the West and Its Impact on the Local Situation

  - Power and Elections

If you are interested to go into more details about the content of the
articles you may find all necessary information on our Internet home-page:
http://www.ca-c.org

PUBLICATION- Inner Asia, Vol. 3, No. 2

Posted by: A. Johnson <aj(a)erica.demon.co.uk>
Posted: 30 Mar 2002


Abstracts:

INNER ASIA vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 101-126
Educating Mongols and Making 'Citizens' of Manchukuo
LI NARANGOA
Japan Centre, Faculty of Asian Studies
Australian National University

Abstract
To control its new possessions Japan needed a mobilisation strategy of its
own. In developing this strategy Japan placed great emphasis on education.
The Japanese authorities saw education as tool for shaping society to serve
their purposes and as part of their broader efforts to establish their
dominance. This essay focuses on Japanese education policies towards the
Mongols in Manchukuo. The Mongols of Manchukuo had a special place in
Japanese policies in the new state. A clear Mongol political presence was
essential to the Japanese construction of Manchukuo as a multi-ethnic state.
The central problem for the Japanese was whether to make the Mongols of
Manchukuo good and useful citizens of Manchukuo or whether to make them the
spearhead of a larger Japanese orientated Mongol state north of China.
Japan's education policies amongst the Mongols reflected these contradictory
aspirations and therefore highlight Japan's general educational dilemmas in
its Asian colonies.


INNER ASIA vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 127-151
The Politics of Writing History in China:
A Comparison of Official and Private Histories
HAIYING YANG
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
Shizuoka University

Abstract
This paper examines the ways in which 'history' is recorded, written or
narrated, thereby exploring the interface between history and anthropology.
The discussion focuses on the Hui Muslim Rebellion in the Qing period, which
broke out at the end of the 19th century, spreading over a vast area in the
northwest of the empire and Central Asia. State-sponsored publications of
history such as Tong shi (General History) or others describe the Hui
Rebellion as a 'revolt by an ethnic minority against the Qing dynasty'. They
do not describe the pillage, atrocities and massacres perpetrated by the
insurgent Hui troops. However, regional history books compiled in various
localities describe the serious destruction caused by the Hui rebel army.
The paper also explores the diverse representations of the rebellion by
Mongol and Hui historians. While recognising the courage of the Hui
insurgents whom the Mongolian army fought, the privately written Mongolian
chronicles describe the rise and fall of the Rebellion in a relatively
neutral and objective manner. Hui historical sources provide an entirely
different perspective, revealing the religious motivation of the rebellion,
and providing the basis for the sort of ethnohistorical project that Zhang
calls a 'history of people's way of life'. Given these widely differing
perspectives in the historical records, the paper urges the exploration of
the commonality between the anthropological approach to history and Zhang's
'history of a way of life' approach so as to better elucidate historical
incidents that have had a major impact on history.

INNER ASIA vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 153-173
The Fate of Empires and Eurasian Federalism:
A Discussion between the Eurasianists and their
Opponents in the 1920s
VIKTOR SHNIRELMAN
Institute of Ethnology and Anthropology
Russian Academy of Sciences

Abstract
The discussion of the problem of federalism and multiculturalism was as
heated among the Russian emigres in the 1920s as it is today. It was
initiated by the Russian Eurasianists who were opposed and criticised by
various ethnic Russian and non-Russian intellectuals. Political, social and
cultural issues were at the core of this discourse, which was concerned with
the relationships between the dominant majority and ethnic minorities.
These debates also concerned the future of the Russian State, its
administrative structure and the construction of a Eurasian Nation.


INNER ASIA vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 175-192
Resisting Colonialism in the Uzbek Historical Novel Kecha va Kunduz (Night
and Day), 1936
SHAWN T. LYONS
University of Virginia

Abstract
In this essay on the Uzbek author and poet Abdulhamid Sulayman Cholpon
(1897-1938), his novel Kecha va Kunduz (Night and Day) is examined as a bold
critique of both Russian and Soviet colonialism in early twentieth century
Central Asia.  Despite increasing censorship and previous arrests by Soviet
authorities, Cholpon subtly employs a variety of techniques including satire
and farce to undermine the legitimacy of the Soviet government that was
being established around him. Bitterly portraying the hypocrisy and
collusion of jadid reformists, Muslim clerics and local Russian officials,
this unfinished novel, which was halted by the author's execution in 1938,
remains as one of the darkest comments on Soviet Central Asian history in
the Uzbek language.


A. Johnson, The White Horse Press
10 High Street, Knapwell, Cambridge CB3 8NR, UK
    tel/fax 0(+44)1954 267527
1 Strond, Isle of Harris, Western Isles HS5 3UD, UK
    tel/fax 0 (+44) 1859 520204
Visit our website at www.erica.demon.co.uk

PUBLICATION- Health Care in Central Asia, Martin McKee et al, eds.

Posted by: IBC Press <info(a)ubcpress.ubc.ca>
Posted: 30 Mar 2002


Health Care in Central Asia

Martin McKee, Judith Healy, and Jane Falkingham

$53.95 Paperback
Release Date: 2/25/02
ISBN: 0335209262
240 Pages

About the Book

Central Asia remains one of the least known parts of the former Soviet 
Union. The five central Asian republics gained their unexpected 
independence in 1991. They have faced enormous challenges over the last 
decade in reforming their health care systems, including adverse 
macro-economic conditions and political instability. To varying extents, 
each country is diverging from a hierarchical and unsustainable Soviet 
model health care system. Common strategies have involved devolving the 
ownership of health services, seeking sources of revenue additional to 
shrinking state taxes, "down-sizing" their excessive hospital systems, 
introducing general practitioners into primary care services, and enhancing 
the training of health professionals. This book draws on a decade of 
experience of what has worked and what has not. It is an invaluable source 
for those working in the region and for others interested in the 
experiences of countries in political and economic transition.

About the Author(s)

Martin McKee (editor) is Research Director of the European Observatory on 
Health Care Systems and Professor of European Public Health at the London 
School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.
Judith Healy (editor) is Senior Research Fellow with the European 
Observatory on Health Care Systems and honorary Senior Lecturer at the 
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.
Jane Falkingham (editor) is Reader in Social Policy and Population Studies 
at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Table of Contents

Part 1 Context

1. Health care systems in the central Asian republics - an introduction
    Martin McKee, Judith Healy and Jane Falkingham
2. History and politics in central Asia - change and continuity
    Shirin Akiner
3. Macroeconomic pressures
    Richard Pomfret
4. Poverty, affordability and access to health care
    Jane Falkingham
5. Patterns of health
    Martin McKee and Laurent Chenet
6. The Soviet legacy - the past as prologue
    Mark G. Field

Part 2 Health systems and services

7. The reform process
    B. Serdar Savas, Gülin Gedik and Marian Craig
8. Health system funding
    Joseph Kutzin and Cheryl Cashin
9. Allocating resources and paying providers
    Tim Ensor and Jack Langenbrunner
10. The health care workforce
    Judith Healy
11. Modernizing primary health care
    Gülin Gedik, Zafer Oztek and Antony Lewis
12. Rationalizing hospital services
    Johannes Vang and Steve Hajioff
13. Restructuring public health services
    In MacArthur and Elena Shevkun
14. Health care systems in transition
    Judith Healy, Jane Falkingham and Martin McKee

Part 3 The countries

15. Profiles of country health care systems
Kazakhstan - Maksur Kulzhanov and Judith Healy
Kyrgyzstan - Acelle Sargaldakova, Judith Healy, Joseph Kutzin and Gülin Gedik
Tajikistan - Rahmin Rahminov, Gülin Gedik and Judith Healy
Turkmenistan - Chary Mamedkuliev, Elena Shevkiun and Steve Hajioff
Uzbekistan - Farkhar A Ilkhamov, Elke Jakobowski and Steve Hajioff

How To Order

In Canada, to order your copy of Health Care in Central Asia, contact 
Raincoast Fulfillment Services at:

Raincoast Books
9050 Shaughnessy Street
Vancouver, B.C.
V6P 6E5
Canada
E-mail: custserv(a)raincoast.com
Phone: (604) 323-7106
or (in North America) 1-800-663-5714

Ordering information for customers outside Canada:

http://www.ubcpress.ubc.ca/books/ordering.html

PUBLICATION- Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst, 27 March 2002 Issue on Web

Posted by: Cornell Svante <svante.cornell(a)pcr.uu.se>
Posted: 29 Mar 2002


The 27 March 2002 Issue of the Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst, a subscription
free Web journal with over 102,000 visitors to the site since November 1999
is now on-line at http://www.cacianalyst.org/

The Central Asia-Caucasus Institute of The Johns Hopkins University-The
Nitze School of Advanced International Studies is proud to announce the
publication of the 27 March 2002 issue of its biweekly Web-Journal, The
Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst.

The Institute also offers its readers the option of downloading The Analyst
in PDF format, enabling readers to view and print out the entire issue of
The Analyst. The html version will, of course, remain available.

The new issue of The CACI Analyst features four Analytical Articles, four
Field Reports, and News Bites from the past fortnight.  The Analytical
Articles feature:

RADIO LIBERTY LAUNCHES CONTROVERSIAL CHECHEN SERVICE
Ariel Cohen
The Bush Administration has allowed the North Caucasus broadcasts of Radio
Liberty-Radio Free Europe to go ahead on April 3. These 15-minute broadcasts
from Prague will include programming in Chechen, to which the Russian
government strongly objects. The Bush Administration's decision to take
action may be interpreted as support for the Chechens, and may complicate
its relationship with Putin at the time the U.S. troops are poised to take
on terrorist elements in the Pankisi Gorge. However, the reasons for this
action may be distant from the Caucasus and have roots in domestic policy
and electoral politics.

CHALLENGES TO SMALL & MEDIUM ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT IN UZBEKISTAN
Douglas L. Tookey
Small and medium enterprise (SME) development offers the key to economic
growth and employment opportunities in Uzbekistan. In recent years the
Government of Uzbekistan has been vocal in its support for SME development,
and it has taken several steps to establish a solid legislative framework
for SMEs. Through their support of various SME projects, many international
organizations and Tashkent-based foreign embassies have also supported SME
development. Serious obstacles, however, still impede the development of
SMEs. These obstacles include the need to expand the knowledge of
entrepreneurs in areas such as accounting, financial analysis, and
marketing, and the need to simplify procedures for obtaining credit.

AMID GLOOM, OPPORTUNITIES FOR CHANGE IN GEORGIA
Mamuka Tsereteli
The recent decision of the United States government to provide special
assistance and training to the Georgian military forces, create a unique
chance for Georgia to strengthen its internal stability. The implications of
this assistance in the area of security is obvious, but there may be an even
broader positive impact on general development in Georgia, for establishing
a rule of law and clearing the way for economic growth and development.


ARMENIAN CENSUS NUMBERS SPARK DEBATE BUT ARE GOOD NEWS FOR PRESIDENT
Jeffrey Swedberg
Most recent analysis of the preliminary numbers from the first
post-independence census in Armenia has focused on the evidence of
population decline. From a domestic political standpoint however, the fact
that Armenia will continue to have an official population over 3 million is
an important psychological boost. Though truth about Armenia's population
remains murky, the census is the latest development in the continuing series
of events improving the political fortunes of President Robert Kocharyan.

THE FIELD REPORTS INCLUDE:

SIX PEOPLE KILLED AND DOZENS INJURED AT DEMONSTRATION IN KYRGYZSTAN
The disturbances regarding the arrest of deputy Beknazarov in Kyrgyzstan
worsened on March 16, when over two thousand protesters were fired upon in
Toktogul. Six people were killed and over 60 people injured in the riot.

BRAWLS OVER THE CONTROL OF CITIZENS UNION OF GEORGIA REACHES CRITICAL STAGE
The struggle for control over the formerly ruling Citizen's Union of Georgia
worsened last week as former speaker Zurab Zhvania seems to lose his
position, being unable to assert control over the party. The shifts in
Georgian politics are likely to be considerable.

THE FIRST CONGRESS OF JOURNALISTS OF KAZAKHSTAN
A great congress of journalists took place in Kazakhstan, and President
Nazarbayev showed both a velvet glove and an iron fist, commending
journalists but also castigating them for 'incorrect' reporting and
insulting attacks on officials.

CASPIAN SUMMIT IN THE WORKS
A Caspian summit is likely to take place in the near future. Some movement
has been made to bring the positions of the parties closer; however, the
outlook for a solution to the dilemma of the Caspian Sea's division is not
likely in the near future.

The Analyst provides a rigorous, concise and nonpartisan forum where
specialists can assess issues and events in the Central Asia-Caucasus region
for a broad audience of business people, journalists, policy makers,
government officials, diplomats and academics.  The Analyst seeks regional
specialists, journalists, economists, and political scientists to join its
pool of authors who are then asked to contribute short, timely, analytical
articles, ca. 900-1000 words in length. The institute pays a honorarium to
the authors. The Analyst also seeks local experts, corporate representatives
and NGO representatives from the region to write Field Reports for a modest
honorarium.

The Analyst provides factual, objective and analytical articles valuing
fresh insights rather than the conventional wisdom.  We welcome readers and
writers from various perspectives and viewpoints.  We value your comments
and suggestions.

Those interested in joining The Analyst's pool of authors to contribute
articles, field reports or contacts of potential writers, please send your
CV to: svante.cornell(a)pcr.uu.se and suggest some topics on which you would
like to write. Please remember that The Analyst does not accept double
submissions.


Svante E. Cornell, Acting Editor
Central Asia-Caucasus Analyst
Central Asia-Caucasus Institute
The Johns Hopkins University
Nitze School of Advanced International Studies
1619 Massachusetts Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20036
Tel. 1-202-663-7712
Fax. 1-202-663-7785
svante.cornell(a)pcr.uu.se

PUBLICATION- Media Insight Central Asia, No. 22

Posted by: Andre Loersch <andre.loersch(a)cimera.org>
Posted: 27 Mar 2002


The latest electronic issue of Media Insight Central Asia is now available
on the web, www.cimera.org, with a special issue dedicated to Islam in the
media in Central Asia: in Uzbekistan, even the Koran is censored! A sample
version of the complete issue can be obtained in PDF format by sending a
request to: andre.loersch(a)cimera.org

Media Insight Central Asia # 22, January 2002
(http://www.cimera.org/publications/ind_camel.htm), addresses the following
topics:

Editorial
ISLAM IN CENTRAL ASIAN
MEDIA: A PREOCCUPYING SILENCE
Discussed all over the world, the question of political Islam in Central
Asia is almost absent from the media in the region. And under the pretext of
ensuring national security, governments might be tempted to pressure even
more dissent voices.
By Andre Loersch, CIMERA, Geneva

Focus: Islam and Islamism in the Central Asian media
THE HIZB UT-TAHRIR THROUGH
THE EYES OF KYRGYZ JOURNALISTS
The Hizb-ut-Tahrir movement is getting stronger in the Kyrgyz Republic. And
while journalists report about them, the content and the tone of the
coverage can either change or manifest the perception of the movement among
the readership.
By Igor Grebenschikov, independent journalist, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

A REVIEW OF ISLAM AND
THE MEDIA IN UZBEKISTAN
"Hold the Koran in your one hand and a computer in the other," was a popular
slogan  in the early 1990s with traditionally-minded intellectuals of
Uzbekistan. Today the media cling to the Koran with both hands as they take
up the issue of Islam.
Marfua Tokhtakhojayeva, journalist, Uzbekistan

THE ABSENCE OF DEBATE ON
ISLAM IN THE TAJIK MEDIA
Despite the fact that the Party of Islamic Renaissance of Tajikistan has
been integrated into the governmental structures, Islam or political Islam

appear like taboo themes for the Tajik press, obviously reluctant to open
debaters in that field.
By Gulchehra Mansurova, Dushanbe, Tajikistan


Current events
UZBEK CENSORS ARE MAKING
THE KORAN POLITICALLY CORRECT
Nothing seems to be holy for the censors in the Uzbek capital Tashkent.
Official numbers on HIV are withheld from the public, the Pope disappears
from newspaper agendas and now even the Koran is worked on with the censors'
red pen.
By Maksum Elbekov, independent journalist, Uzbekistan

THE RIGHT TO WRITE: THE MEDIA
VERSUS THE STATE IN KYRGYZSTAN
Kyrgyzstan's independent press and the government have clashed. Two
independent newspapers have been suspended, and a temporary new provision,
'The Order of Publishing Activities in the Kyrgyz Republic,' restricts
publishers' rights.
By Vadim Blum, media expert, ICAM*, Kyrgyzstan

TRIALS AND TRIUBULATIONS OF AN
UZBEK NEWSPAPER IN KYRGYZSTAN
The first independent Uzbek language newspaper in Kyrgyzstan, Mezon, started
in 1996, covering political news.  Now it is closed because of debt, an
absence of quality management, a shortage of professional staff and
intra-office intrigues.
By Kamil Satkanbaev, journalist, Kyrgyzstan

A UNION FOR UZBEKISTANI
INDEPENDENT JOURNALISTS
Founded in April 2001, the Uzbekistan's Union of Independent Journalists has
staged a number of events in support of journalist's rights. Though
overburdened with censorship and control, media workers are not jumping to
join the Union.
By Muhammad Amin, journalist, Uzbekistan

REGIONAL CONFERENCE
CALLS  FOR NEW TRADE UNIONS
In the city of Almaty, Kazakhstan, journalists from five Central Asian
countries discussed with international experts the problems of editorial
independence and the reform of public television and radio broadcasting.
By Nuriddin Karshiboev, CIMERA, Tajikistan

POST-CONFLICT AFGHANISTAN
AND THE MEDIA IN TAJIKISTAN
Despite the direct effect that the reconstruction of post-Taliban
Afghanistan will have on Tajikistan both at home and abroad, the country's
journalists seem to be ignoring the is-sue, mirroring the scope of reporting
within Tajikistan itself.
By Turko Dikayev, independent journalist, Kulyab, Tajikistan

Interview
UZBEK MEDIA: A VIEW
FROM AN OUTSIDER LOOKING IN
Censorship in Uzbekistan impedes democratic progress and lowers the
aspiration of journalists to develop their skills. A journalist from
Uzbekistan who works in the West believes that the country's media and
society exist in parallel realities.
By Iskandar Khamroh, journalist, Uzbekistan

Opinion
THE MEDIA AS POLITICIANS:
OBJECTIVITY IN CENTRAL ASIA
In Central Asia, information on neighboring countries is scarce.  For this
and other reasons, the media is not yet in a position to provide versatile
and objective information on the most important problems in the facing the
region .
By Gulchehra Mansurova, Media-centre, Dushanbe, Tajikistan

PUBLICATION- Taliban: A Shadow Over Afghanistan, B. Brentjes and H. Brentjes

Posted by: Ullas Sharma <rishipub(a)satyam.net.in>
Posted: 26 Mar 2002


Taliban:
A Shadow Over Afghanistan

by

Burchard Brentjes
Helga Brentjes

Afghanistan has been in the news for sometime now. One of the least
developed nations in the world, with one of the lowest life expectancy, a
phenomenally high inflation at 500% and the largest number of landmines per
square kilometer in the world - this country has been in the news for all
the wrong reasons. A never ending civil war has seen hundreds of thousand
killed and maimed and millions flee to the neighbouring countries of Iran
and Pakistan. The civil war continues regardless. Widows are forced to beg
on the streets of Kabul, as they are not allowed to work, unemployment is as
high as 50%! It seems that the only occupation that an average Afghan knows
is to fight. Industrialization has yet to reach these unfortunate people and
the few industries that they had have since closed.

Lack of education breeds fanaticism, Afghanistan is no exception.
Fundamentalists like Osama bin Laden thrive in such environment. The current
rulers of the major part of Afghanistan - the Taliban have taken to
following religion to ridiculous extent. While they did much to follow the
real Islam, they also ensured that Afghanistan became one of the largest
exporters of heroin with a tenfold increase in its production in their
regime. Repeated setbacks have not extinguished the spirit of the doughty
Afghan who still carries on with life.

Afghanistan had been the theatre of war between the two super powers of the
world, Soviet Union and United States. After the invasion of Afghanistan by
the Soviets the proxy war between the two intensified. Soviet Union was bled
to its ultimate demise, Afghanistan was shattered.

With the disintegration of the Soviet Union many thought that peace had
finally returned to Afghanistan. They were wrong. The West now eyed the
Caspian oil that was now within their reach. The easiest way to bring it to
the world market was through Afghanistan on to Pakistan. The war and mayhem
made this impossible. Taliban was created with the tacit aim of subduing all
the tribal chiefs and ensuring the safety of the proposed pipeline.

Profusely illustrated, this book should be useful to the students of South
Asia, Middle Eastern Studies and International Relations as also those who
are interested in knowing the history, sociology and politics of this
ancient land.

Contents:

1.  Petroleum and War Again
2.  Geography, Climate and Economic Conditions
3.  Economic and Social Conditions
4.  Ethnic Problems in Afghanistan
5.  History of a Transit Land
6.  Battles of Liberation and the Pashtun Kingdom
7.  Reform, Reaction, Revolution
8.  Freedom Fighters or Fanatic Terrorists and Ruthless Mercenaries
9.  Gorbachev's Policy and Afghanistan
10. The Islamic Resistance
11. Benazir Bhutto, Islamic Fundamentalists and the Taliban
12. Islam - in History and Modern Politics
13. Cold War II and the East
14. Appendices a) Women's Rights in Afghanistan b) Fundamentalism c)
Hydrocarbons in Economy and Politics d) The Oriental Mode of Production e)
The Squandered Cultural Heritage
15. Epilogue - Hijacking a part of the Cold War II
16. Political Actors in Afghanistan
17. Chronology
18. Notes and Literature

About the Author:

Prof. Dr. Burchard Brentjes was a professor of Central Asian studies and
archaeology in the University of Wittenberg, Germany till 1991 when he
retired. Author of more than 55 books and hundreds of articles his books
have been translated into more than 13 languages. His other titles from
Rishi Publications are: Armenians, Assyrians and Kurds: Three nations One
Fate?, Oil Dollars and Politics and Arms of the Sakas.

Dr. Mrs Helga Brentjes is a philologist by training and a journalist by
profession. Author of several books she is also the wife of Prof. Burchard
Brentjes.

2000 195p 21 photos US$28 ISBN: 81-85193-24-X

Published by:

Rishi Publications
76, Chandriaka Colony
Varanasi - 221010
INDIA
Phone: 0091-542-221337
Fax: 0091-542-222337
E-mail: rishipub(a)satyam.net.in

ON-LINE PUBLICATION- Environmental Country Profiles for Central Asia

Posted by: T. Matthew Ciolek <tmciolek(a)coombs.anu.edu.au>
Posted: 26 Mar 2002


Forwarded from: The Asian Studies WWW Monitor: late Mar 2002, Vol. 9, No. 6
(166), 22 Mar 2002

Environmental Country Profiles for Central Asia

World Resources Institute (WRI), Washington, DC, USA

Self-description: "WRI provides easily accessible and accurate information
on environmental, social, and economic trends for all regions of the globe.
In this section, WRI draws from its much larger collection of information
posted on EarthTrends (http://earthtrends.wri.org/) to provide a specific
look at Central Asia.

Site contents: * Environmental country profiles [for Afghanistan, Iran,
Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan Pakistan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan]:
Biodiversity and Protected Areas, Forests and Grasslands, Coastal and Marine
Areas, Agriculture and Food, Freshwater, Atmosphere and Climate, Energy and
Resource Use, Population and Human Development, Economic Indicators; *
[Annotated maps of] watersheds for: Amu Darya, Indus, Kura-Araks, Lake
Balkhash, Syr Darya, Tigris and Euphrates; * Data tables: Emissions from
fossil fuel burning and cement manufacturing, Food and agriculture production.

[Documents and data are in PDF format - ed.]

URL http://www.wri.org/central_asia/index.html

Internet Archive
http://web1.archive.org/web/*/www.wri.org/central_asia/index.html

Link reported by: Nelson Wong (vlmy_editor(a)time.net.my)

  * Resource type [news - documents - study - corporate info. - online guide]:
    Study/Documents
  * Scholarly usefulness [essential - v.useful - useful - interesting -
marginal]:
    V.Useful

Source: The Asian Studies WWW Monitor ISSN 1329-9778
URL http://coombs.anu.edu.au/asia-www-monitor.html
Announce your new/improved Asian Studies' Web sites via
http://coombs.anu.edu.au/regasia.html

Dr T. Matthew Ciolek
Head, Internet Publications Bureau, RSPAS,
The National Institute for Asia and the Pacific,
The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
tmciolek(a)coombs.anu.edu.au
ph +61 (02) 6125 0110
fax: +61 (02) 6257 1893
http://www.ciolek.com/PEOPLE/ciolek-tm.html

PUBLICATION- Post-Soviet Eurasia: Ethno-cultural Specificity of Soc. & Pol. Processes

Posted by: Sergey Golunov <sgolunov(a)hotbox.ru>
Posted: 26 Mar 2002


Post-Soviet Eurasia: Ethno-cultural Specificity of Social and Political
Processes.  The Annual of the Center for Regional and Transborder Studies
(the former Center for Eurasian Studies). Ed. by S. Golunov.
Volgograd, "Print" Publishing House, 2001, 147 p. 5 papers/abstracts are in
English, 8 in Russian. ISBN 5-94424-005-9.

The volume opens the series of the annual publications of the Center for
Regional and Transborder Studies . a research unite within Volgograd State
University re-organized in 2001 from the Center for Eurasian Studies. This
annual represents the papers devoted to analysis of social and political
processes with ethno-cultural peculiarities within the Eurasian
(Post-Soviet) space.

Contents:

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND SECURITY ISSUES

Oleg Boronin (Altai State University, Barnaul)
The Shadow Of the Dragon over Altai (in Russian)

Sergey Golunov
Central Asian Security Complex: transborder issues of the Post-Soviet period

RELIGION AND SOCIETY

Victor Victorin (Administration of Astrakhan Region)
On the Problem of the Islamic "Renewal Movement" in the peaceful and the
radical forms (according to the materials of the Astrakhan's community in
1990-2000s) (in Russian)

Mutahir Ahmed (University of Karachi, Pakistan)
Fundamentalism in Afghanistan and its Impact on Central Asia

CULTURE

Freda J. Fuller Coursey (University in Wichita Falls, Texas, USA)
The Relationship of Language, Culture and Identity in the Post-Soviet World

HISTORY

Vladimir Kostornichenko (Volgograd State University)
The Soviet Union and Western Oil Corporations (in Russian)

REVIEWS, SURVEYS

Tomasz Kamusella (Opole University, Poland)
Lew Gumilow [Lew Nikolaevich Gumilyov]. Dzieje etnosyw wilekego stepu
(History of the Ethnoses of the Great Steppe). Cracow, Oficyna Literacka,
1997 (Translated and afterward written by Andrzej Nowak)

THE PAPERS OF YOUNG RESEARCHERS

Katerina Arkhipova (Volgograd State University)
The Conflict in Nagorny Karabakh: Geopolitical Factors of Negotiation
Process at the First Half of 1990s (in Russian)

Aidai Bekbosun kyzy (Kyrgyz State National University, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan)
Some problems in the Process of Coming to the Being Political Opposition on
the example of Kyrgyz Republic (in Russian)

Andrey Nikiforov (Volgograd State University)
Maintenance of National Cultural Safety of Russia in Conditions of Creating
Unified Educational Space (in Russian)

Alexey Shalinsky (Volgograd State University)
Pollution of Environment and the Ecological Policy of Kazakhstan (in Russian)


All queries should be sent to:

Dr Sergey Golunov
Director
Center for Regional and Transborder Studies
Volgograd State University
30 2nd Prodolnaya St.
Volgograd 400062
Russia
Tel:7 (8442) 432025
Fax:7(8442) 438124
e-mail: sgolunov(a)hotbox.ru

PUBLICATION- OSCE/UN ODCCP Conference Report Available

Posted by: Rainer Hermann <rhermann(a)osce.org>
Posted: 23 Mar 2002


OSCE released Summary Report on Bishkek Conference on Security and Stability
    in Central Asia

VIENNA, 12 March 2002 - The OSCE released today a Summary Report on the
Bishkek International Conference on Security and Stability in Central Asia,
held on 13 and 14 December 2001 in Kyrgyzstan.  This conference was
co-sponsored by the OSCE and the United Nations Office for Drug Control and
Crime Prevention (UN ODCCP).

The Summary Report contains on 218 pages, the speeches and interventions of
the 300 conference participants (in English and Russian), as well as the
main documents adopted in Bishkek, the Conference Declaration and the
Programme of Action.

Formally known as the "Bishkek International Conference on Enhancing
Security and Stability in Central Asia: Strengthening Comprehensive Efforts
to Counter Terrorism", the international gathering was held to discuss
comprehensive and concrete steps to prevent and counter terrorism,
especially with regard to providing practical support to the five Central
Asian OSCE participating States.  The event was attended by representatives
of more than 60 states and international organizations.

The report is available electronically under www.osce.org/events/bishkek2001/

ON-LINE PUBLICATION- Monumenta Altaica: Texts in Altaic Languages

Posted by: Ilya Grountov <ilya(a)model.mccme.ru>
Posted: 23 Mar 2002


Monumenta Altaica

altaica.narod.ru, Russia

Linguistic site, containing texts and links to texts in ancient and modern 
Altaic languages: Turcic, Mongolian, Korean, Japanese and Manchu-Tungusic; 
considerable bibliography on Altaic languages and links to the online 
dictionaries of the Altaic languages.

[A bi-lingual (EN, RU) site]

URL http://altaica.narod.ru


Source: The Asian Studies WWW Monitor ISSN 1329-9778
URL http://coombs.anu.edu.au/asia-www-monitor.html
Announce your new/improved Asian Studies' Web sites via
http://coombs.anu.edu.au/regasia.html

PUBLICATION- Central Asia News, WPS Media Monitoring Agency, Moscow

Posted by: Daniil Kislev <ferghana(a)ferghana.ru>
Posted: 22 Mar 2002


Dear Colleagues:

The WPS (http://www.wps.ru) Media Monitoring Agency new daily digest Central
Asia News is issued on weekdays, at 10:00 a.m., Moscow time. It covers the
most important articles about Central Asia states, including current events,
anti-terror operation in Afghanistan, international cooperation, domestic
and foreign policy issues of Central Asia countries. The digest is based on
the following sources:
  * Russian national press,
  * Web media,
  * Local print and electronic media.

Additionally, this digest is supplemented with first-hand information
received from Ferghana.ru (http://www.ferghana.ru) Agency correspondents.
The language is Russian.

The average size of one issue is 80-100 kb.  Subscription price is $50 per
month for organizations and $25 for individuals.  We would be happy if you
find our new product helpful.

Best regards,

Daniil Kislov
Central Asia News Editor
WPS
ferghana(a)ferghana.ru

Go to: Publications Index Page | Publications Posting Archive Pages: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26

«Central Eurasian Studies World Wide» is a project of the
Program on Central Asia and the Caucasus
Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard University